graphology

Michael Green's picture

hi

im undertaking a project based on the rules of handwriting analysis and then applying these rules to add personality to a text using typography.

has anyone tried this before? im looking to learn from previous works so i dont make similar, if any, mistakes.

also, any recommendations on technical graphology books is appreciated. lots of relationship analysis chaff out there!

regards
mike

John Hudson's picture

im looking to learn from previous works so i dont make similar, if any, mistakes.

Presuming that there is any validity at all in graphology strikes me as mistake number one.

Michael Green's picture

john

i agree with your statement but i obviously havent explained myself correctly.

i am more interested in the system and its experimental application.

if anyone has any insights please let me know

cheers

John Hudson's picture

...to add personality to a text using typography.

That's the bit that seems to be begging the question. Applying the 'rules' of graphology as a typographic system in an experimental way shouldn't presuppose a result ('personality').

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hi Mike,
here’s a related thread. There I had linked to a spot-on definiton of graphology by John Butler.

As I see that you also are looking for reverse italics, I presume that you want to assign different typographic voices to different parts of your text, possibly roles in a drama? That sounds interesting – if my guess is right. But where does the g-word come into play?

F

John Hudson's picture

So I learned a new word yesterday: graphotherapy. It stands to reason, that if our personality is expressed in our writing then the reverse might also be exploitable, that personality problems can be corrected by changing our handwriting.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Oh yes, graphotherapy! Great.
Featuring Lucida, the typeface with multiple personality disorder … or was it just the only font they could find with ‘handwriting’ in its name?

Michael Green's picture

point taken john. appreciate all the links.

florian - im attempting a graphological markup language and yes, in graphology, a left slant tendency shows emotion and reserve hence me looking for a reverse italic.

i REALLY dont want to skew the type to the left- i might just handdraw the whole thing.

Thomas Phinney's picture

i am more interested in the system and its experimental application.

But graphology isn't *a* system - it's a bunch of competing and substantially contradictory systems. You'd have to pick one, first.

Of course, what's the *point* of trying to apply it to typography as a theoretical framework? Unless your audience is familiar with the theories of the particular graphology system you've used as your basis, it won't enhance your communication to the audience in any way.

Cheers,

T

Michael Green's picture

ok - the system which comprises various subsystems

It is an experimental typography project but thomas, you are correct in your idea that i will need to have additional explaination present to communicate my idea

M

Don McCahill's picture

> So I learned a new word yesterday: graphotherapy.

Hey, I think I will start a new science: typographotherapy! Anyone want to sign up for sessions? Only $200 for a half hour.

Nick Shinn's picture

Presuming that there is any validity at all in graphology strikes me as mistake number one.

Type designer as actor?

Stephan Kurz's picture

If you are looking for graphology as a concept (or several), you best start with visiting a library that holds a lot of books from around 1880 to 1930, which is as far as I can see the period of time that most of the standard literature was first published.
If your interest is more on a markup system to transcribe manuscripts (correct me if I’m wrong when reading im attempting a graphological markup language in this direction), you’d better start with existing ones, TEI might suffice for a start.

Michael Green's picture

thanks for the link stephan. TEI looks like a good starting point

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