oodles of poodles

Nick Shinn's picture

This thread is dedicated to words, which, through no fault of their own, are interesting in print.

Words with holes, repetitive shapes, ambiguity, &c:

savvy
assesses
aggregate
modern
filling

Any others?

pattyfab's picture

Worst name ever: my mom's friend Barbara Fatt who married a guy named Heine. No joke.

Nick Shinn's picture

My Grandmother had a friend with the maiden name of Strange who married a Mr How.
The newspaper announcement was, "How Strange".

dezcom's picture

Then there is the politically famous Hog family who named their twin daughters Ima and Yura.

ChrisL

fontplayer's picture

A popular Vietnamese name is Ha. So it is conceivable that at some point there could be a Ha-Ha union announced in Garden Grove, CA.

dezcom's picture

Better than a Ho-Ho reunion at a 7-11 :-)

ChrisL

Tim Ahrens's picture

Ok, we are going totally off-topic but never mind:

This is the story of Mr and Mrs Peacock, who named their daughter Drew:
http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article95505.ece

Scalfin's picture

Apparently, there is an actual man with the the birth (and current) name Max Flightmaster, and has the rank of Staff Sergent. So he's Staff Sergent Max Flightmaster.

pattyfab's picture

Let's not forget Cardinal Sin, of the Philippines.

There is a gravestone for Dong Suck at Forest Lawn cemetery.

And I also saw a wedding announcement for Sascha Wiener marrying Harlan Wakoff. I hope she didn't hyphenate.

And for the record, Ima Hogg was a real person but she didn't have a sister Yura.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ima_Hogg

eliason's picture

I took a class from Professor Dumm in college.

BlueStreak's picture

I needed medicine in Kansas once and was surprised when I was told to just go to the Damm Pharmacy.

dezcom's picture

Patty,
I can just hear the hostess at the big chain restaurant calling out over the loud speaker, "Dong Suck, party of six!"

ChrisL

Florian Hardwig's picture

Back to the ascenders John had asked for.
Today I saw this old blackletter street sign, and once more I was astonished to see how much more ascenders (and descenders!) we could have with a long s:


Methfeſſelſtraſʒe [Methfesselstraße]

eliason's picture

taramasalata: the Greek dip that also serves as a kerning string!

dezcom's picture

I am a big fan of HAVAWAVAYAVATAVAH for kerning caps but it makes a damn lousy hors d'oeuvre ;-)

riccard0's picture

MAMMA MIA

paul d hunt's picture

Chris, i thought that was a Jewish traditional song.

dezcom's picture

:-) No, Paul, you are confused with "Have a Mug o my eela" a song written by the mother of Jackie Mason's third cousin twice removed, "Ma Chuganah" ;-P

Stickley's picture

I rarely see these written, but it looks a mess when you do:

A's's
I'd've
I'd'ven't

1. The Oakland Athletics' pitcher - the A's's pitcher
2. I would have gone to the show, but I was ill.
3. I would have not gone, but I had too, it was a class requirement to see the play.

Sherri Keller's picture

How about "fogeyfying"

I just saw this in one of Nick's articles. I find any word with v or y repeating or in close proximity to be mesmerizing.

dezcom's picture

"fogeyfying"

I resemble that remark "-)

eliason's picture

I'd'ven't

Really? Never heard that one.

ctbeiser's picture

Aioli
Knurled
Quarks

eriks's picture

Have these been mentioned?
Long German palindrome (attributed to Schopenhauer):
Ein Neger mit Gazelle verzagt im Regen nie
(no translation possible because Neger is a no-no word these days).

And the shortest English word with all vowels (if you do not call y a vowel) in their alphabetical order:
facetious

eliason's picture

And the shortest English word with all vowels (if you do not call y a vowel) in their alphabetical order: facetious

Excepting the far rarer caesious.

(if you do not call y a vowel)

And if you do?: facetiously

John Hudson's picture

Aeaea (mythological Greek island)

mosh's picture

Weltschmerz.

dishdesigner's picture

This post just doesn't want to die! It seems to have taken a break between 2008-2010 and again from 2010-2013....and now it's making the rounds on Twitter again.

Has anyone suggested turning this into a Type Challenge for February 2013?.....Come on, throw-down! How about taking just one of the first 20 words in this post and trying to pick the most interesting text setting to submit?

The winner is picked based on choosing the face that best visualizes the inherent rhythmic interest in the word and showcases its own interesting glyphs, the most interesting interaction with the word's semantic meaning, and most refined aesthetic setting.

LIST:
savvy
assesses
aggregate
modern
filling
banana
punctuation
filigree
graffiti
titular
boondoggle
representative
look
pool
room
marmalade
geostasis
spoon
palpate
sportsl

dishdesigner's picture

......so as not to be one who throws down a challenge and then runs....
(but I'm not above picking the low-hanging fruit!)

cuttlefish's picture

I've been wanting to compile a new list of kerning words. This seems as good a place to start as any.
But, as for my favorite interesting letter combinations:

marijuana
ixixatchil
basilisk
fussbudget
xvart
flumph
phthalocyanine

BeauW's picture

I've been working on a script font inspired by the word 'minimum', trying to reproduce the unreadability of that word in unical hands...

Birdseeding's picture

újjáépítéséért

is a classic in Hungarian. Also, apparently a Guiness world record. Means "for its rebuilding".

quadibloc's picture

If one removes lyxvillor from the Swedish language, where will it end?

Eventually, it will end up not being possible to sing En tuff brud i lyxförpackning, and who would want that to happen? Although, admittedly, the last word in that song title doesn't have the repeated verticals after the first syllable, so perhaps it is safe.

Maxim Zhukov's picture

Aeaea (mythological Greek island)

On Venus, ah, on Venus,
there are no hurtful or harsh words.
The angels on Venus speak
A language of vowels only.

If they say ‘e-a’ and ‘a-i’
it is a joyful promise.
‘U-o’, ‘a-o’ are a golden memory
of ancient paradise.

From Na dalyokoy zvezde Venere... (“On that faraway star, upon Venus”) by Nikolay Gumilev, 1921 (that was Gumilev’s last poem).

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