20s German face

Richard Hunt's picture

Anybody help with this one?

Merci a l'avance

Bleisetzer's picture

Good evening,
or whatever time it is when you read my comment...

The problem is:
two dozend of Antiqua were built between, lets say,
1900 up to 1920. All called with a name part like
"Roman" (Römische or Romanische). They all look
a little bit the same way.

This one shows some typical signs like the lower
case "e" or the upper case "A", not to forget the
special "R" rounding (this is typical for those
Romans.

The best source "Seemann - Handbuch für Schriften"
is not senseful to use because they used the word
"Hamburg" or "Hamburger". But not in this case,
I checked it.

Its a typography book, mh?
It tells something about form and spirit (Ausdruck).
Can you tell me in which year the book was printed?
Or the title and author? That makes it easier to find
it. Is it printed in Leipzig e.g.? So it could be a
Schriftguss or Schelter & Giesecke type.

You see... I'ld like to help, but I'ld need your support.

Regards,

Georg
_______________________________________________
„Ich bin ein Preuße, kennt Ihr meine Farben...“

Richard Hunt's picture

Hi Georg

Thanks for your comments. The image is from the Berlin art magazine G, edited by El Lissitzy, Werner Graeff and Hans Richter in the early 1920s. The typeface is a little bit like Italia in structure, but different in many details.

Richard

wmayer's picture

Hi Richard,

I'm sure this is Grimm Antiqua
you may also take a look at http://typophile.com/node/35530
which was a question for types from the same magazine

Wolfgang

Richard Hunt's picture

Thanks Wolfgang, this is very helpful.

Bleisetzer's picture

Fine job, congratulatons, Wolfgang.
Grimm Antiqua schmalhalbfett (bold condensed)
J. Klinkhardt, Leipzig
1914

There is a small example on:
http://www.global-type.org/Schriften.567.0.html

But its not in the Klinkhardt specimen of 1908 and I cannot find a full character set example anywhere.

Georg
_______________________________________________
„Ich bin ein Preuße, kennt Ihr meine Farben...“

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