Gild - Luxury Men's Cosmetic

shawn harris's picture

Hey Guys!

I am working on a identity and packaging project for one of my design studios and this is my idea so far. A luxury men's cosmetic company, salon level products. I imagine men in their late 20's to their 50's, probably businessmen, live in the city, maybe single.
This is the first time I have ever hand lettered anything like this from sketch to screen. I am going to post the basic black and white form first...it needs help. still in the baby stages.
initial

here is the same with a variety of colors and in reverse.
colors

and now a SEPERATE and yet related issue: the tagline type
tagline

critique em!

aquatoad's picture

I think your sketch has lots of energy and the basic form is nicely balanced, particularly with the tagline below.

My concern is that it look very drawn on a computer. Not a bad thing, just seeing some tortured beziers. I'd suggest taking the basic form that you have (which is nice) and work it out on paper using a veriety of different writing instruments. Try pencil, try charcoal. try a thin and flexible watercolor brush. try fingerpainting, try a stick, use paint, use pastel, use ink. Draw it 100 times in less than an hour. Bang Bang Bang.

Then when you digitize it, it will have some vibrancy, but with consistency (which I think is lacking now since you drew it with a digital tool, not a physical one). You don't have to be great with your hands to do expressive handcrafted work. Side note: The gi connection is distracting.

Good luck!
Randy

hrant's picture

Wow, what a nice shape. Complex, and crazy modulation, but coherent and meaningful nonetheless. A big problem though: to me it doesn't say "luxuries for middle-aged men" at all, quite the opposite - it's a lot more like a snowboarding logo! :-/

hhp

shawn harris's picture

doesn't say middle aged men. crap.

do you think this lettering could ever look aimed at the middle aged men market? Or should I srap it and keep exploring?

opinions?

oh and also could anybody help me with incosistency stuff in the shapes of the letters...my eye isn't sharp enough..or my brain knowledgable enough to pick out how to make things more correct.

thanks

hrant's picture

Well, make sure you get other opinions before you abort - I'm certainly not omniscient! Not even close.

Inconsistencies: they're totally part of the charm here - I wouldn't touch that!

hhp

shawn harris's picture

What kind of marker would you suggest, I am a total newb with hand rendering type. I will post another idea i think feels "more mature" in a while.

sx.

shawn harris's picture

Ok here is an earlier idea before I tried the hand lettering. the typeface is mrs. eaves.
Is this closer to the business man city dweller image?

gild

thanks
sx.

shawn harris's picture

wow - thats HUGE....

my bad :-)

sx.

andrew_baker's picture

The GI lig has an egyptian feel. I see a hieroglpypic eye inverted.



andrew_baker's picture











I thought of this logo from your description.

pablohoney77's picture

gild as in gilding the lily?
what's in the name? might help us help you out a bit better.
(and yes, i DO know the meaning of the word, just wondering WHY that word?)

shawn harris's picture

ok -

gild in my mind is the process of getting ready - - taking care of ones self. Another gild definition could mean to encrust or coat something with gold. I think it is a short strong word, that could be memorable in a good way.

I thought maybe a gold foil for the logo on some crisp white stock might be nice for a label. Still working on that end...

As I did my research it seems that most men's labels are very much like the example from Andrew Baker's above post...very minimalist. I tend to work in that style, and it seems so obvious. So I was trying to get away from that...but maybe the best solution is a simple straightforward type solution like the gild in mrs. eaves. I have another week to go so I am going to continue to explore the mark and also materials for the labeling and packaging.

thanks a lot people

sx.

pablohoney77's picture

i just thought that the choice of the name gild was an unfortunate one. since to gild means literally to coat in gold i'm not sure if using another metal is approprate. maybe avoid the whole metalic vibe altogether and break the anticipated association? i had to chuckle as i was verifying the defintion, that a secondary definition is "to make deceptively attractive" very apropos for cosmetics huh?

shawn harris's picture

// secondary definition is "to make deceptively attractive" //
yes you are right, maybe to close to the true intent of cosmetics. To be honest though, the assignment is for shampoo, conditioner, and soap. So, I was being a little broad with my cosmetics bit early on. Although I don't think there would ever be a real brand that only did shampoo conditioner and bar soap... :-)

Other name choices I have pondered: Modello, robusto, modostile, luxe, modo, bloke, oakwood, churchill...thats most of them.

So, I believe I will hold gild in reserve and back to the drawing board. If you have any you all really like from the list above let me know...

sx.

pablohoney77's picture

oooh! of those i'd have to say i like luxe by far. it jumps off the screen compared to the others. but that's just my opinion. oh, and i'm sorry, i didn't know you had chosen the name! *blushing*

Hildebrant's picture

modello is definately the most safisticated name. This implies luxery to me. Luxe, well to me this says shiny club shirts.

I do really love the gi ligature in giuld.

Tell us more about the textiles itself.

hylas's picture

Hi,
just a small remark - your first design... I dont know, I feel you could have a bit of a problem on international market - shapes look quite cyrillic, in fact some strange combination of Russian and Macedonian version spelling ye (like in yellow) i (like in it) ly (like in Spanish Llama example

designalchemy's picture

I like earlier idea using Mrs Eaves- simple , elegant, hits target audience.. New concept does nothing for me. Considering the target audience I doubt it will be very functional. Shapes are clumsy and too playful, GI glyph is too abstract, varied line widths are too extreme, negative space is distractive. Looks like a cross between Cyrillic and Arabic, possibly illegible to someone who does not know what it is suppose to spell out.
My suggestion- go back to original design which works. Remember you are not the client. Someone has to generate money with this,

aluminum's picture

I like 'bloke' ;o)

I also like the Mrs. Eaves mark. Perhaps extend the 'l' up above the 'd'?

fonthausen's picture

I prefer the Mrs. Eaves.

I would shorten the upper stroke of the 'd' though. (maybe to the same optical height as the 'gi' ?)

The distance between the 'l' and 'd', could be a fraction bigger.

shawn harris's picture

Ok so I am working on either shortening the d or making the l taller! That seems to be everyones feeling, one or the other needs to be more dominate...Thanks for all the suggestions. I will post a version of each, because I cannot decide which I prefer more.

I agree that my handlettered version does have some strange similarities to egyptian/cyrillic based type. oh the wonderful subconcious.

-sx.

hrant's picture

Mrs Eaves for a masculine mark?!

hhp

fonthausen's picture

> [Men are now more feminin according to the newest trends ;-)

--Jacques]

shawn harris's picture

maybe I should create a modified version of mrs. eaves called mystery eaves...the ambigious multi-sexual typeface of the future!

-sx.

(still tweaking my examples)

hrant's picture

Call it Mr Richard - Mrs Eaves's first husband :-).

hhp

designalchemy's picture

Metro Eves, or Meves.

ebensorkin's picture

What about something that feels even more old fashioned - for some reason I thougfht of guild - as in a group of men who know how do do something like tan leather or make jewelry. If that was the reference...

then maybe Requiem would be good. It has strength but refinement too.
http://www.typography.com/catalog/requiem/index.html

Vitus could be nice - it has a certain rough masulinity
http://www.fountain.nu/catalogue/vitus.asp

or go *really* old school
http://madtype.net/dunelm.html

-e.

Hildebrant's picture

Vtius is my next purchase.

shawn harris's picture

GREAT CALL!
Vitus looks very nice and I am leaning towards buying it because I have a freelance project that could very possibly make use of that face...
I am at my parents house for the easter weekend and I haven't yet made the jump to a laptop, so I am stranded with no legitemate computer. I will post more variation of the mrs.eaves gild and hopefully a version with vitus sometime early next week!

-sx

Hildebrant's picture

The 'A' in Vitus has a bit of the PRADA feel to it.

cjg's picture

Shawn, I really like the Mrs Eaves, particularly if you elongated the L and perhaps made the base serifs on the i and l touch. Whether or not the subtitle says "For Men" is debatable, but I definitely think that a short caption completes the form of the marque since the lc binocular g ligature is such an optically large letter compared to the rest. Having "For Men" or "Pour Hommes" or similar floating under the text is a nice feature.

But Vitus has a certain flair to it that I can't deny. More on that when we see a new version.

Miss Tiffany's picture

I think it would depend upon your middle-aged man. I'm assuming this is for the "metrosexual" market (those who genuinely do want to look model perfect) and maybe those men like Jack Nicholson who we all perceive to be an absolute tiger and babe magnent.

Your lettering reminds me of P.Diddy for some reason. It is very urban. If someone wants to feel younger, or is perhaps going through midlife and wants to shake things up, your lettering could be very appealing. However, I think it needs more uniformity. Some of the shapes seem, too thin in spots. (It's like bed linens, the higher the thread count, the higher the quality.) Maybe you need to get some nice smooth vellum paper and a good new wedge marker and play with the sparking on some paper. Get the feel for what a graffiti artist can do.

Well, that's how I see it.

Miss Tiffany's picture

I do not think you should have the phrase "for men". The locations at which high quality and high end products are sold it is very clear if it is men or women. Thomas Pink in London ... the brand is called PINK ... but he specializes in men's (and now women's) fashion. Very high end.

I think using gold might be too obvious, are there other metals or textures that would be better? "Yes, I can afford the Aston Martin Vanquish, but I'm humble enough to stick to a nice Lamborghini Countach."

Stephen Coles's picture

Eben - Vitus is an excellent idea. Nice call.

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