Glyph names

Nick Job's picture

There are occasions in Fontlab when two (or more?) glyph names automatically generate the same Unicode character (e.g. arrowleftup and uni2196). My question is, is there a list of the glyph names which map to a particular Unicode character and if so where? I guess this query is likely to be related to a wider topic of how best to name your glyphs which may have gone before. Ring any bells?

k.l.'s picture

There are such lists -- search your harddrive for "Mapping" folders which contain files with the ".nam" extension. From within FLS, you may set your default mapping file in the preferences/options dialog "General Options / Unicode and OpenType" and choose a particular mapping file e.g. when you use functions like "Glyph / Glyph Names / Generate Unicode ...". Indeed there were a couple of Typophile threads indirectly dealing with them, maybe you'll find some by googling with the keywords "glyph" and "naming".

Karsten

twardoch's picture

By default, FontLab Studio uses the standard.nam mapping file. If a glyphname in this file is preceded with an exclamation mark, then FLS will generate a Unicode codepoint if it finds such name but it will not generate this name for a given Unicode codepoint. If a glyphname is not preceded with an exclamation mark, then FLS will generate a Unicode codepoint if it finds such name and it will generate this name for a given Unicode codepoint. If for a given Unicode codepoint, the list does not contain a name without an exclamation mark, the name uniXXXX will be used (where XXXX is the hexadecimal notation of the Unicode codepoint).

In other words, for any Unicode codepoint, a .nam file should contain no more than one glyphname without an exclamation mark but it may contain any number of names with an exclamation mark. To quickly covert your glyph naming from "obsolete" to "current" glyph naming, first choose Glyph / Glyph Names / Generate Unicode and then Glyph / Glyph Names / Generate Names.

Adam

A.

twardoch's picture

Ps. There is a chapter in the FontLab Studio manual devoted to glyph naming and encoding, which contains a pretty solid recipe for naming glyphs.

Nick Job's picture

Thanks very much Adam and Karsten.

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