looking for fonts with mixed upper and lower case letters.

brokedesigner's picture

I'm designing a logo that would benefit from mixing lower and upper case letters and im looking for a font that does that well. I've never trying mixing upper and lower cases so im not sure about the specific best practices when it comes to that.

Jan's picture

Do you mean unicase?

Like this:
http://www.emigre.com/fontpage.php?PFilU.html

Miss Tiffany's picture

Here's a unicase search at Fontshop and another at MyFonts.

Thomas Phinney's picture

My own Hypatia Sans has such "unicase" glyphs available as alternates. They're in a stylistic set (#13), easily accessible if you're using InDesign CS2 or later. All six weights of Hypatia Sans are available as a registration incentive for the Adobe CS3 applications.

Regards,

T

fiftyfootgirl's picture

I like Uni F from Fountain...

Spire's picture

I like Panoptica.

James Arboghast's picture

I’m designing a logo that would benefit from mixing lower and upper case letters and im looking for a font that does that well.

What  s t y l e  of lettering do you have in mind? Book roman, linear sans serif, tuscan, Neuland-like, Bauhaus-like?

Amity is a unicase display type well-suited to logo work.

j a m e s

kentlew's picture

With certain typeface families you can mix small caps with lowercase and get good mixed-case results. It depends upon the scale and weighting of the small caps. And it can often take a little fiddling with point size to get good harmony.

-- K.

cerulean's picture

I recently discovered that H&FJ (in its presentation of Cyclone) calls this "biform". It may just because I've been working on one of these for the past several years, but I think I prefer this term. While "unicase" implies a lack, the idea that you only get one case where other typefaces have two, "biform" emphasizes the choices made available.

writingdesigning's picture

"While “unicase” implies a lack, the idea that you only get one case where other typefaces have two, “biform” emphasizes the choices made available..."

I agree with you on that, but still feel unicase sounds like a typographic term, while biform sounds a bit like it has to do with say, polymer technology. Maybe just a matter of familiarity :)

cerulean's picture

And, I now realize, there exist unicase fonts with only one form per letter. So perhaps "biform unicase" is best considered a subcategory of unicase.

Rob O. Font's picture

"...a logo that would benefit from mixing lower and upper case letters..."
I'm guessing this means like NeXT, iPod or McDonald's?

But I like Biform too. One Roman and one "Frank", is how I think of it.

Cheers!

Rob O. Font's picture

"Here’s a unicase search...at MyFonts."
Also, following this thread, I think certain fonts are silly offers for MyFonts to make, like e.g. Soap.

Cheers!

Nick Shinn's picture

“While “unicase” implies a lack, the idea that you only get one case where other typefaces have two, “biform” emphasizes the choices made available...”

It is quite possible to have a "unicase" font with two cases, i.e. big and small letters. This situation exists normally with letters such as c, s, x, and o, which have the same form in both cases.

So really, "biform" is a bit of a misnomer, as each letter has only a single form!

So I propose that this category of typeface, presently termed unicase, by renamed UNIFORM or MONOFORM.

Eunoia Unicase (above) is monoform, cased with different sizes--strokes widths optically adjusted and kerned between cases. Panoptica Script (below) is monoform, but rendered slightly differently between cases as stylistic alternatives.

Uniform is probably better, as it implies that the form is unified between cases, whereas monoform suggests that there is only one form, which could also describe a single case of titling capitals.

brokedesigner's picture

I'm sorry i should have clarified. I'm designing a logo for radiohead's new album "In Rainbows". I have a concept that involves having the letters In raised above rainbows, and im experimenting with different fonts and cases, for the word rainbows, thus far lower case r and a are working quite well but i dont' want to use a lower case b because i want the word rainbows to be as contained within a rectangular shape as possible. Here are a couple of loose sketches im working on right now.

brokedesigner's picture

Almost forgot i should probably explain the reasoning behind this design. The basic concept goes like this, the term in rainbows is about how we all chase "rainbows" (i.e. our dreams, relationships, goals, etc.) but often times when we reach that "rainbow" we see that it is emptiness. So i thought the best way to express this visually was to simply use the in that was already in the word rainbows and raise it above the rest of the word thus creating an empty space representing the emptiness of the rainbow. Naturally in needs to be the first read so i used the wavy lines on the rest of the word (which also resemble the curvature of a rainbow) to fade it back. Also the album feels very stripped down and light so visually the lines worked to bring about that feeling as well. However i haven't nailed down the typography very well and could use any advice you guys might have.

david h's picture

> I recently discovered that H&FJ (in its presentation of Cyclone).......

they promote smoking/cigars etc etc — Tabacos Cigarillos?

Nick Shinn's picture

Your concept of getting the letters to do double duty, but only showing them once is intriguing.
Perhaps if you combine n and b with a common element that exists in a quantum state--in either letter, depending on the reader-- that could help demonstrate the idea.

James Arboghast's picture

Amity was made with rainbows ;^)

...often times when we reach that “rainbow” we see that it is emptiness

...wavy lines on the rest of the word (which also resemble the curvature of a rainbow...

No really, one of the key words for Amity at Myfonts is "wavey". A lot of the capitals are made out of quarter rounds, and the blurb mentions "overhead underhang". The upper B has a gap filled with emptiness ;^)

When I made this I went for a bleak effect...emptiness.

That's all I could come up with in five minutes.

j a m e s
"I don't mind as long as somebody else is paying."

James Arboghast's picture

Starting to look cheesy, but it's going somewhere. Cheap colored lights. Cheap effect.

Discounted selective gaussian blur adds fake depth. Price-snipped TV scan lines. Lowest-bidder materials throughout. One thenth of a dollar, one tenth of a dollar...

Amity's capitals are a bit strange, but groovy and wavey. Use the caps for "RADIOHEAD" and you get an odd matching effect with the curvey lower case "rainbows".

j a m e s
"the same friend who wrote to Thomas Bradbury"

brokedesigner's picture

thanks for all the advice, I've advanced the logo to a rough comp. I combined some characteristics from the font ambule and ITC bauhaus. However im unsure on a lot of the details of the lettering.

Miss Tiffany's picture

I think where you are now is good progression. Once you start tracing these out for final draft I think the problems will give way. One thought, is the bowl on the a too large? And what if the S were a little more complete?

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