Arabian fonts.

CFCG's picture

Hello,

Arabian people write fron right to left?
How does arabian font work?

I will really appreciate if someone have information about this.

Thanks!


Carlos Fabián Camargo G.

raph's picture

This is a fascinating, rich, and deep topic. Here are a few links I've found to get you started.

This book looks like it has all the answers: Arabic Typography: a comprehensive sourcebook.

Many resources at Mamoun Sakkal's site, including this interview.

Nadine Chahine has a blog on the subject.

Some very detailed articles including some history of the alphabet and simplification attempts.

A five year old typophile thread that's still relevant: http://www.typophile.com/node/223

delve's picture

Carlos,

Yes, the Arabic script is written (and read) Right to Left.

Many of the glyphs within an Arabic font will link (overlap) accordingly.
However, it is up to other software (E.g. - word processors) to allow the
user to compose and display the glyphs in the Right to Left sequence.

Below are some things to help you find more info.

Delve

Arabic Typography: A Comprehensive Sourcebook
by Huda Smitshuijzen Abifares

http://typophile.com/node/16288

http://typophile.com/node/18507

http://www.microsoft.com/typography/OpenType%20Dev/arabic/intro.mspx

http://www.arabictypography.com

http://www.linotype.com/2427-18249/howtobuildyourfontfiles.html

Vysionous's picture

Hello,
Arabic is written and read right to left. There are 2 types of Arabic calligraphy, one called "Naskh" which is individual characters, and one called "Requa" which is script calligraphy. However, all Arabic authentic lettering should have supporting shapes either on top or underneath in order to be read the right way. These shapes are like dashes, circles and some other shapes. Those shapes stand for the vocal grammatical pronunciation. Its quite a complex calligraphy especially the "Requa", and thats the one used in the Holy Quoran Book.

I hope that was of help.

http://vysionous.deviantart.com

John Hudson's picture

Are you looking for technical information on how to make an Arabic font?

Despite its title, Arabic Typography: A Comprehensive Sourcebook is far from comprehensive, much of its technical discussion is very weak and actually derived from examples of Latin type, and there are inaccuracies and omissions. There isn't a single good source of information of Arabic typography. For technical information on Arabic OpenType fonts, this is the best place to start:

http://www.microsoft.com/typography/OpenType%20Dev/arabic/intro.mspx

If you are interested in the Arabic script in general, as opposed to the technical stuff, there is a massive amount of material written about the scribal heritage (I don't use the term calligraphy, because that refers to a very specific kind of art-text, and misses the point that most of what scribes historically produced is everyday text.

There are 2 types of Arabic calligraphy, one called “Naskh” which is individual characters, and one called “Requa” which is script calligraphy ... Its quite a complex calligraphy especially the “Requa”, and thats the one used in the Holy Quoran Book

This is a misleading statement in many ways. There are many more than two styles of Arabic script. Naskh (also called Nesih) is not 'individual characters': it the most common text hand used in formal manuscripts, including most Qur'ans (in Persian influenced areas, Qur'ans are also written in the nasta'liq style).

Mohamed Zakariya, the leading Islamic calligrapher in the USA, is developing what promises to be an excellent website devoted to the Arabic script. Unfortunately, his page on different styles is not yet illustrated:

http://www.zakariya.net/history/examples.html

Si_Daniels's picture

>There are 2 types of Arabic calligraphy

Just as there are two types of font - serif and sans ;-)

CFCG's picture

Thank you all.


Carlos Fabián Camargo G.

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