'Spoken' looking typeface

javi2307's picture

Hello all,

Well here is a good one for anyone who wants a challenge!

I am currently designing an advert in which the headline copy is a transcript from a phone conversation. Initially I thought about a handwritten typeface to make it look more relaxed, informal, etc. Most typefaces that I found are not quite right as they are too stylised or the balance between the characters are too eratic.

So The question I am setting...

Can anyone recommend a typeface that 'looks' spoken?

Many thanks
Javier

fontplayer's picture

I have always thought Preface by Nick Shinn looks very personable.

Action Man from Iconian doesn't look very erratic:

Also Blambot has lots of 'hand' fonts that are very structured.

Antroposophia by Manfred Klein:

Of course it depends on who is talking. For a baby from the Museo de las Momias, this one kind of works:

(one of my favorite pangrams)

javi2307's picture

true...
very interesting... :)

smrvl's picture

I was on dafont.com all day yesterday for work, and was once again surprised by the pleasant variety and general good execution of the fonts in the "Fancy > Comic" section. The site itself is being bratty right now (they predict repairs by next week), and as with all free fonts, you want to check out what you're getting closely before you get it, but you might find something you like in there.

Personally, I like Komika Hands. Mmmm ... alternates...

Koppa's picture

Coop Light is nice.

MHSmith's picture

One of my favourites (at least the original): "Tintin Talking", 1930s Belgian comic style.

fontplayer's picture

(Tintin nabbed for future use)

Another that might be considered is a neat hand-lettered font called Medrano by Tepid Monkey:

Tup by Graham Meade:

Graham has several fonts that would fit this category nicely, imo. Like Worstveld, Blound, and one of my favorites: Stripwriter.
http://www.myfonts.com/browse/foundry/typotheticals/

javi2307's picture

WOW Great fgeedback guys... I have lots to play with :)

I have suggested to a friend starting an expriment in which we relate spoken word to organically generated font shapes.
The idea would be to speak into a mic and see what comes out at the other end, hopefully type hat 'looks' lik eyour voice...
should I venture into this realm?
: /

javi2307's picture

WOW Great feedback guys... I have lots to play with :)

I have suggested to a friend starting an expriment in which we relate spoken word to organically generated font shapes.
The idea would be to speak into a mic and see what comes out at the other end, hopefully type hat 'looks' lik eyour voice...
should I venture into this realm?
: /

cuttlefish's picture

Yes, you could graph the waveform of a voice recording and adjust the height and width of the letters in the text to the corresponding shapes, I'm not sure a handwritten font would work so well for that, though. A boxy sans might be easier to deal with.

With some sophisticated scripting, you might be able to use the sound data directly in modifying type, in which case use whatever style of letter you like. I'm no programmer so don't ask me how you would do this.

dberlow's picture

"Can anyone recommend a typeface that ’looks’ spoken?"
The short answer is, any typeface that has quotation marks would do something of the sort (so to speak). "Does this look spoken?" Hope so.:) Sure, you can throw a speech balloon around anything and make it "spoken" as well... or can you?... There is a much longer answer that goes back to the notion that all type selection is a choice between one "tone of voice" and another. This has broken up a bit with the advent of fonts popular because they include in their design predefined faults associated with poor output (grunge) or limited compositional capabilities (monospace or stencil). Some of the examples above with grunge in a balloon make the point quite well that the more personality in the design, the less range of spoken word can be effectively carried, even with a balloon. Another example of this would be to visualize the stencil font appearing elsewhere on your screen in either quotes or a balloon. How many tones of voice would that carry effectively? So what looks spoken? Or what doesn't look spoken? Point size and other composition requirements are important obviously, but just what tone of voice is to be conveyed should be explained before a range of choices could possibly be explored, in my opinion. If on the other hand a speech balloon is inevitable, then comic book lettering is going to be the choice through sheer familiarity of the user.

"...speak into a mic and see what comes out..." lol, good luck. Or I should say, reverse it (at least in your mind), and try making a tone of voice for just a few 1000 fonts.

Cheers!

cloud11's picture

I had cooper in mind too.

Syndicate content Syndicate content