e-shape umlaut

typovar's picture

I just posted this in 'Blackletter', but maybe someone in 'Type-ID' knows more about this... I'm not sure ...

Via Google books I saw a book, printed in some kind of Blackletter (Ueber Deutsche Runen, Wilhelm Carl Grimm, Göttingen, 1821). The shape of the umlaut caught my eye, but I paid no further attention. Today I visited someone who had a piece of furniture with type on it. This cupboard is made in 1855 and the type used seemed familiar. Indeed, it featured the same kind of e-shaped umlaut on top of the 'a'.
What font is it?
Arjen

ralf h.'s picture

The e above vowels is the regular design of an Umlaut in blackletter. It doesn't just look like an e, it is an e that moved from behind the vowel on top of it. »Boese« became »Böse«. Two strokes or dots above the vowel are younger shapes that replaced the e over time.

But unfortunately digitized blackletter typefaces often don't use the original shape. Try Alte Schwabacher or Breitkopf-Fraktur.

Ralf

typovar's picture

Thanks.
The faces you mentioned don't seem to have the umlaut. But I'll keep on searching!

ralf h.'s picture

They do, I have printed samples of both right here. But as I said: They are often replaced in the digital versions.

You may also want to browse this collection:
http://www.moorstation.org/typoasis/designers/steffmann/

Ralf

typovar's picture

I'm sorry, I didn't read too well...
I've been at steffmans site before. Manfred Klein is also active in digitising ancient type???

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