OTF problems with Quark 7

nlx's picture

i'm using Mercury Text with Quark 7.1 and i experience strange problem : the apostrophes are replaced by the one of another font !

Any idea ?

nlx's picture

things like 'œ' or 'ÀÉ…' doesn't work either… and it works in Indesign :/

Bald Condensed's picture

You are a very brave person to still use QXP. :^/

OldSchool's picture

I'm still using Quark 6.0; they've gone beyond any useful functions as far as I'm concerned and not providing an incentive for me to update other than that I may have to open someone else's file created in a newer version. Not a big fan of InDesign - still seems way too clunky -- and could it require more memory?

Stephen Coles's picture

How much memory do you have? What operating system are you running? What CPU do you have?

jmickel's picture

I think the problem may be that you are using Quark.

Not that InDesign is all that forward thinking with OpenType. Still no OT palette in CS3, and Illustrator has had one since CS.

I never thought I would leave Quark (3 years ago), but I have since realized that it was an abusive relationship that I was all too comfortable in.

Aside from actual software problems and IMHO useless new features, the company seems to have a lack of dedication to the creative community in general.

I CRINGE everytime I see their packaging, covered with Photonica stock images that we've all seen a hundred times.

And their serious missteps with their identity redesign have been chronicled many places.

Come over to the light side! Escape the duark!

j

nlx's picture

well, maybe you should know i'm an InDesign user.

I need to use Quark for a specific work where the client requires to (as they need to open the docs, i only do the A.D.).

I'm using OS X 10.4.10 on an old G5 1.6 ghz, 1.5 GO Ram
i cleaned font and app cashes, erased JAWS files etc.

I'm afraid i have to think of a postscript replacement font for that job now, i have no idea what font can replace Mercury text, this is depressing…

jmickel's picture

Strange, I purchased Mercury not long along and got it as Postscript, not Opentype.

Do you have Fontlab? ; )

Stephen Coles's picture

Typefaces that could replace Mercury:

Farnam Text
FF Clifford
Miller Text

But H&FJ might provide you with the format you need. Have you contact them for support?

nlx's picture

gonna do that

nlx's picture

NB. Miller is indeed very close, but mercury is far more space-savy !

Thomas Phinney's picture

> Not that InDesign is all that forward thinking with OpenType. Still no OT palette in CS3, and Illustrator has had one since CS.

If you want it, ask for it using the feature request form: http://www.adobe.com/cfusion/mmform/index.cfm?name=wishform

The InDesign team believes that not many people want this, because nobody requests it. (I reviewed a list of over a thousand InDesign requests, and there was at most one request for this.)

Regards,

T

Nick Shinn's picture

The InDesign team believes that not many people want this, because nobody requests it.

I've never "requested a feature" because I'm not in the application design business.
The problems with OpenType implementation are far deeper than anything that can be solved by "feature request".
I pointed out the shortcomings of InDesign's OpenType interface in an article I wrote in 2002...

"InDesign has OpenType features buried on
a second-level pop-up menu, with attributes
that, confusingly, appear to duplicate those
on the “styling” menu."

... the same shortcomings exist today, several versions later -- and it looks like they will continue to exist as long as the CS team apparently follows a method of product development more inclined to "feature design by user committee" than taking a leadership role in solving a fundamental interface design problem.

Of course, user input through feature request is not without merit--but it doesn't seem to be working for OpenType.

Stephen Coles's picture

I've gotta agree with Nick on this. Adobe's got to take the lead in OpenType support because most users don't understand it well enough to request app features. There has been some good headway, but there is more to be done.

A good chunk of Photoshop users would never ask for a glyph palette in PS. Certainly that doesn't mean there shouldn't be one.

.00's picture

Last year Daniel Pelavin and I were asked to speak to a group of NYC designers called Spark. There were about 40 or so designers in the audience, mostly freelances and principals of small firms. I asked how many were using OpenType, not only were they not using it, they had never heard of it!

k.l.'s picture

terminaldesign -- I asked how many were using OpenType, not only were they not using it, they had never heard of it!

How encouraging ...  ;-)

Stephen Coles -- I’ve gotta agree with Nick on this. Adobe’s got to take the lead in OpenType support because most users don’t understand it well enough to request stuff.

Some thoughts:

It is sad that even InDesign hides OT options behind an almost invisible little button. OT options are similarly hidden in Apple's applications. We have the strange situation that foundries must provide manuals which show how to use fonts in this or that application.

Amusingly, it is XPress 7 whose button for OT options at least shows the blue-green italic OpenType 'O' icon.

But still, all these are special interest applications.
I wonder if there might be unexpected help from another side. WPF has full OT support and seems to make it relatively easy to develop gadgets / widgets / applications. Maybe soon individual developers will come up with little apps which have OT support? (This were even more likely if Microsoft would provide standard UI elements for this.) The existence of their 'Downloads' platform indicates that Apple understood the relevance of hobby or small developers. Another aspect are efforts to bring WPF to OSX (Silverlight) and possibly even Unix (third party) -- one could rely on WPF without fear addressing a single platform only.
It is only by way of mass market applications that awareness of OpenType can increase. But that's thoughts only.

Thomas Phinney's picture

Plenty of innovative features come from Adobe internally, whether it's Live Color, Live Paint or nested styles. But something like this is obvious to you all, so it *is* appropriate to listen to actual users.

If none of you think it's worth using the request form, that's unfortunate. Somehow it is more gratifying for Nick to complain repeatedly about it on Typophile. Okay, whatever makes you happy.

Cheers,

T

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