Museum Fonts

Bobby H's picture

Hi, very nice lift on the site by the way.

What are some favorite museum fonts from independent foundries? Paradigm from Shinntype is a nice example. How about some others? Thanks...

Stephen Coles's picture

Could you describe what you mean by "museum fonts"?

Bobby H's picture

Fonts that would be at home in a museum for exhibition use and other curatorial work. Also, fonts that would easily enable the branding of a special exhibit, be it for a classical orientation or a contemporary one, as examples.

Norbert Florendo's picture

> Museum Fonts
I honestly thought you meant a font viewed in a museum...
like I loved reviewing the original Giambattista Bodoni punches at the Plantin-Moretus Museum in Antwerp.

adnix's picture

Well, Whitney by H&FJ was designed for the Whitney Museum. It's a huge family.

Stephen Coles's picture

This is akin to asking "what's a good company font" before designing a logo.

I think you should seek a typeface that fits the exhibit rather than one that fits museums in a broad sense.

cuttlefish's picture

I think of museum fonts in terms of "microsignage". That is, the small labels and placards that accompany exhibits, along with the larger, text heavy posters explaining the exhibits. This is related to, but not the same as, the fonts on the wayfinding signs that direct you through and between exhibits, but those could be included in the superset of museum fonts as well.

I can't help but keep thinking of how to redesign the signs in the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum in San Jose. they have some labels on their exhibits that haven't been changed since they were typed in the '60s (like, on a typewriter, man).

(not much of an answer, more of a comment)

Si_Daniels's picture

>I honestly thought you meant a font viewed in a museum...

A related question, I'm helping with an exhibit of Matthew Carter's fonts for Microsoft during Typecon. Which font should we use on the captions for artifacts?

kegler's picture

Bruce Rogers' Centaur (Metropolitan) was originally made for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1914

CameronM's picture

I think H&FJ also designed Guggenheim's house font for them (now commercially available as an expanded family called Verlag). I'd love to hear more about fonts designed for museums or art galleries, as I work in-house at an art gallery. We are considering a re-design of our corporate style and this would be an excellent starting point for considering new house fonts.

Stephen Coles's picture

sii - Of the fonts he did for MS I think Georgia works best in print.

Bobby H's picture

CameronM - I already cited Paradigm. I also think FS Ingrid and Dalton Maag's Interface are wonderful families to consider for your project and a related project that I, too, have in mind. Also, I would think that FF Scala would be on anyone's shortlist for this type of application.

Si_Daniels's picture

>sii - Of the fonts he did for MS I think Georgia works best in print.

Thanks, you're probably right. I wonder if one of his retail fonts might work better?

litherland's picture

I’d love to hear more about fonts designed for museums or art galleries, as I work in-house at an art gallery. We are considering a re-design of our corporate style . . .

Cameron, I would think that you would want to study the Walker Art Center's very ambitious identity program.

Don McCahill's picture

> I honestly thought you meant a font viewed in a museum

> Paradigm from Shinntype is a nice example.

Are you saying Nick belongs in a museum?

:)

Bobby H's picture

Actually, I was wondering, "If you had an art gallery, museum, or similar environment, which independent foundry faces would be in your top ten for this type of application? ... and also your three indy "must haves."

Nick Shinn's picture

...Nick belongs in a museum

In true Typophile style, I'll take that as a complement.

Bobby H's picture

sii - you may also want to consider Gerard Unger's Capitolium. Mr. Carter seems to respect this typeface, calling it "very Gerard Unger."

Michio F's picture

I love Tate Gallery's Typeface.

TBiddy's picture

I love Tate Gallery’s Typeface.

Word.

In true Typophile style, I’ll take that as a complement.

Unless they mean the natural history museum. Oh snap! ;)

ChuckGroth's picture

St. Louis Art Museum uses Trajan for its signage, but not its 'microsignage.'

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