Pop quiz rides again

steve_p's picture

What happened to the pop quiz thread?

So, here's a new one...

Start off by getting the year and country of origin of this masthead:

masthead

(That's not the whole masthead BTW - more can be revealed if necessary)

beejay's picture

Ireland.

steve_p's picture

Close

Thomas Phinney's picture

England, 1898?

T

steve_p's picture

Closer - right country, but a little older than your guess.

kennmunk's picture

1764?

steve_p's picture

Sorry, not that much older.
Another clue...
strike2

kennmunk's picture

Got it!

The Graphic: An Illustrated Weekly Newspaper
1850-1898

Or do you want an exact date?

Oh, And in a week I'm going to good ole London Town, let me know if there's anything specific I should see. (type-wise.)

kennmunk's picture

It must be either
1861
1867
1872
1878
1884
or
1895

steve_p's picture

Looks like you win Kenn - here's the full masthead...

a

...and the whole page...

b

The exact year is 1872, the event is the Agricultural Labourers' strike - the meeting pictured, at Wellesbourne, Warwickshire, was the founding of the first Agricultural Labourers' Union, nearly 40 years after the trial of the Tolpuddle Martyrs.

kennmunk's picture

The trees have legs.

So do I get to pick the next one?
I really should be working...

steve_p's picture

>>The trees have legs
Or maybe the people just have branches?

>>So do I get to pick the next one?
Yes

>>I really should be working...
You don't want to be doing that...no telling where it might lead.

kennmunk's picture

I'll probably add something tonight.

Tonight CET that is.

kennmunk's picture

Ok, what's wrong here?
signlang

glutton's picture

Well, for starters it doesn't have an a-circle. Is it just standard ASL?

kennmunk's picture

Oh.
That was too easy then.
It says "Danish Sign language" at the top but lacks the Danish special characters.

glutton's picture

OK, country and year, and for added points, artist:

1

glutton's picture

Stumped?

2

Thomas Phinney's picture

Germany, 1815?

Just going back to "The Graphic" for a moment, I was over at Ole Kvern's place today, and discovered that he had a framed front page of it to the side of his entryway.

T

cerulean's picture

A second answer to the sign alphabet one... If it is the ASL alphabet (whether the Danes really use the same one or not), then someone forgot to put in the dotted motion line indicating that Z is not just a pointing finger but a finger drawing a Z in the air.

kennmunk's picture

the postcard with the sign language alphabet was sold to me by a guy pretending to be deaf, being a type-geek I pretended not to notice the characters missing.

John, I was going to say German too, but it's in English so I go for

England, early 1900s

steve_p's picture

England 1851?





glutton's picture

Kenn's the closest so far. BTW the artist has a well-known font named after him.

3

Thomas Phinney's picture

Johnston?

kennmunk's picture

This one's a killer...
If it's not Johnston, I'll try the next obvious choice: Gill?

Is it part of the number '2' that's showing after 19?

matteson's picture

America, 1922.

glutton's picture

Nathan, very very close. Right on the country, super close on the year. Not Johnson, not Gill.

f

glutton's picture

Superstar!

matt_desmond's picture

I'm pretty sure that's because for advertising, heavy display type was in vogue during that time period. Gotta love the Coop.

glutton's picture

The Gutenberg Bible?

gerald_giampa's picture

Speaks good English for a German.

Thomas Phinney's picture

The Gutenberg Bible was in Latin, and didn't have any Roman text mixed with the blackletter.

The typography looks plausible to be the 1611 King James Bible, though I've never seen a sample, so I don't know. It's hard for me to tell from the small size, but the Roman font and the wording both seem a little late to be from the early 1500s (first English bibles start around 1526). I'm thinking somewhere between 1570 and 1800.

But must get back to work....

T

Chris Rugen's picture

A JPEG?

Kidding... :-)

While I have no basis for the guess, other than knowing it's not the Gutenberg from the English, etc. I would guess the same as Thomas.

However, my guess would be "The King James Bible?" and not the much more dedcutive and insightful version above. I've now exhausted my Bibles Throughout History knowledge.

kegler's picture

A wild guess...Fust and Sch

Nick Shinn's picture

Rich, I've got my Avant Garde ligature specimens at the ready, so hit me with your best shot.

kegler's picture

Oh, is that how this works?

OK...

Name the full lineage of ownership of the Kelmscott Albion Press No 6551

matteson's picture

1891-94: Hopkinson & Cope
1894-96: William Morris
1896-1924: Ashbee's Essex House Press, Old Bourne Press, Pear Tree Press
1924-61: Bertha and Frederic Goudy
1961-2001: Elizabeth and Ben Lieberman
Currently: Jethro K. Lieberman

William Berkson's picture

Wow, I didn't think anyone knew my cousin has the Kelmscott-Goudy press. It is a very cool piece of equipment. Lots of type luminaries, including Hermann Zapf have, I believe, printed samples on it, as I did as a teenager long years ago.

kegler's picture

> 1891-94: Hopkinson & Cope > 1894-96: William Morris > 1896-1924: Ashbee's Essex House Press, Old Bourne Press, Pear Tree > Press > 1924-61: Bertha and Frederic Goudy > 1961-2001: Elizabeth and Ben Lieberman > Currently: Jethro K. Lieberman >

Missing a few owners in there still :^)

matteson's picture

>Missing a few owners in there still :^)

Darn it. :-/

>as I did as a teenager long years ago.

You can officially consider me jealous, William.

kegler's picture

OK, only two other owners...

matteson's picture

I suppose I could go to the library, since no one else seems to know this either.

Does Ashbee's wierd communal guild count as something different than Essex House? And when he went bankrupt, did the bank repo the press?

kegler's picture

It's not well known and only documented in a few places. hint: Both were between Goudy and Lieberman and during the late 1920s Goudy only had the press for a couple years.

kegler's picture

I didn't even know the full list... there were even more owners than I thought. I will post the full list in a bit.

Nathan had it mostly correct. I pass the quizmaster hat to him...

kegler's picture

The life and times of Albion 6551
1891-94: Hopkinson & Cope
1894-96: William Morris
1896-1913: Ashbee's Essex House Press,
1913-20 Washington Herbert Broome- Old Bourne Press
1920: Miss Nellie Platt (Broomes Secretary)
1920-24: James Guthrie -Pear Tree Press
1924-25: Bertha and Frederic Goudy -Village Press
1925-28: Spencer Kellogg -Aries Press
1928-32 (Storage)
1932-1961 Merbert Cary -Press of the Woolly Whale
1961-2001: Elizabeth and Ben Lieberman
Currently: Jethro K. Lieberman

matteson's picture

Well, that was a pretty ignoble win :-/ And I just barely escaped returning all my overdue material to the Chicago Libraries in order to check out The Liberty Bell on the Kelmscott Goudy Press.

I find that I'm horrifying at coming up with quizzes, but here's my offering. Name the artist, publication, and date.

matteson's picture

Incidentally, I'm on my way out. I'll be back in about 12 hours.

kegler's picture

WAD, The Ship Earth, 1944

kentlew's picture

Rich, wasn't the full title The Crew of the Ship "Earth"?

-- K.

kegler's picture

I concede to Kent...it is

glutton's picture

They kinda look like the Monkees.

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