>>> Type ID Pop Quiz V2.3 - Intermediate Level

Bald Condensed's picture

This is how it works:

  • A complete glyph is published in the Type ID Pop Quiz.
  • Try to identify the typeface. To win, you need to name both the typeface and the weight.
  • Show off your knowledge by casually mentioning additional trivia, like who designed it, when and by whom was it (first) published, and other cool stuff to impress your fellow Typophiles with.
  • The winner produces a new challenge -- a complete glyph, black on white background, presented in a 288 x 288 pixel square, including a R204G000B00 1 pixel border.
  • The person who posts a challenge can't win the next game.

In case of any disputes, I will act as judge, jury and avenging angel of wrath.

If you think this is a little too difficult, maybe try the Entry Level Type ID Pop Quiz first. Too easy? Go to the Expert Level Type ID Pop Quiz.

Good luck everyone, and have fun. ;^)

With respectful thanks to the originator of this utterly useless but highly entertaining waste of time, the often imitated but never duplicated Cheshire Dave.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hooray! Alright, here we go again. Guess this one’s way easier …

Paul-Kenji Cahier's picture

Linotype's Stempel Schneidler Black's question mark?

Jan's picture

Wow. I’d make that an exclamation mark.

Florian Hardwig's picture

That’s right, DeathWolf!
It looks like from some wacky comic script, so out of place in this distinguished Venetian … Take over!

T.'s picture

Well let's rock! Show those glyhps.

T.'s picture

Well, I like this Quiz, it would be a pity if it dies in quietness.
(Is that in correct English?)

Linda Cunningham's picture

I think the phrase you're looking for is "dies a quiet death," and I agree that it needs to be revived.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Well, DeathWolf changed his name & disappeared …
I’m looking forward to new glyphs, too. As it was my challenge he answered before, I guess it’s okay to post another one, in order to keep the thread alive. Paul-Kenji, if you’re still around, I’ll step back immediately, of course.
Gonna make it a rather easy one – so Ties, be quick!

T.'s picture

Don't know this one... :-(

Linda Cunningham's picture

It's a lowercase, italic d, and a beautiful one at that.

T.'s picture

It sure is beautiful, yes.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Linda is right about the italic d, of course.
Some trivia? The font designer’s father was into type design himself. When the font was expanded 65 years after its first release, the work was done by another type designer’s son.
The font is named after someone whose father again had the same profession.

Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

It is Cochin Italic.

Linda Cunningham's picture

Beat me to it, Pieter!

Florian Hardwig's picture

Yes, that’s right! Designed in 1913 by Georges Peignot, son of Gustave Peignot, expanded by Matthew Carter, son of Harry Carter. Named after Nicolas Cochin le jeune (the younger), son of— well, you know …

Florian Hardwig's picture

By the way, this beauty comes (or used to come?) with the standard Mac OSX installation.
Pieter, please take over!

fission's picture

Looks like Futura Display, but upon closer examination, I don't think so ...

Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

Futura Display is very nice, but this eogonek is from a different typeface.

Berg's picture

It looks like Teuton Fett Bold

Pieter van Rosmalen's picture

Hello Irène, it’s not looking like Teuton, it is Teuton.
It’s you turn now.

Berg's picture

Next one...

T.'s picture

It really looks Lineto Vectrex, but it isn't.

T.'s picture

Maybe Gridnik?

Berg's picture

This type was created by a Typophile font designer.
And no, it is not Vectrex or Gridnik.

Miss Tiffany's picture

I thought it by be SuperDuty by James Grieshaber by it doesn't match either.

Berg's picture

SuperDuty it isn't.

Berg's picture

Time for another hint
It is a unicase and tabular typeface

Berg's picture

Time for another hint. It is a unicase and tabular typeface, created by a Typophile font designer. He recently created new typefaces for a major canadian newspaper.

paul d hunt's picture

awwww. i woulda know from the last clue! but i'll let someone else get this one. i have a nice little booklet set in this suite of faces given to me by the designer: it's very interesting.

fission's picture

Panoptica Octagonal

Berg's picture

Yes, it is Panoptica Octogonal, by Nick Shinn. Your turn now.

fission's picture

This one should be easy... I picked it because it caused my eyes to cross when I first saw it, haha...

Florian Hardwig's picture

Oh, georgeous double-v! That looks like Monotype’s Ehrhardt, coming in semibold italic flavour.

fission's picture

You are correct, sir! :D
(Isn't it scrumptious?)
Your turn...

Florian Hardwig's picture

Great!
You are correct —Well, not in spelling gorgeous … 8-}
Okay, here is mine:

fission's picture

"The person who posts a challenge can’t win the next game."

Does this mean that I can't answer this one? ;-)

Florian Hardwig's picture

I guess that’s what it says … :°) Yet, you may help providing hints—if necessary.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Okay, first hint: The glyph is not taken from an italic cut—although there are italics with this font.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Another hint? In 5 years, the typeface will be as old as its designer was when he made it.

Linda Cunningham's picture

It's sure a beauty, Florian!

Florian Hardwig's picture

Ah, Linda, glad to see that there’s still someone around!
All too often—imho—it’s a Sleeping Beauty, slumbering in the Library folders of people who think system fonts inherently have to suck.

sim's picture

>Okay, first hint: The glyph is not taken from an italic cut—although there are italics with this font.

Is this “f” could be a fake outline italic created from the short cut keyboard?

Florian Hardwig's picture

This glyph is neither a 'f’ (f as in U+0066) nor is it a fake outline.

Miss Tiffany's picture

That is Latin small letter f with a hook. According to the character palette. Also used to designate folders by some.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Yes, that’s the glyph! It’s my favourite one—as it is also called ‘florin’.

Ricardo Cordoba's picture

it is also called ‘florin’

...because it's used to designate that currency as well, right?

Florian Hardwig's picture

Right. Actually, the currency’s name is 'Gulden’ (Guilder). The Dutch, among others, used it from 1279 until 2002—when it got replaced by the Euro. The first gulden was named ‘florijn’, for the coin bore the Florentine lily. Nowadays, there’s still the Netherlands Antillean gulden (NAƒ) and the Aruban florin in use, afaik.

Ricardo Cordoba's picture

Wow, thanks for all of the info, Florian. Good to know.

fission's picture

Since nobody has replied for a few days, I feel compelled to give a further hint... ;-)

As Florian previously hinted (more obscurely), it is a font bundled with recent Mac OS X systems.

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