Ambigrams

ill sans's picture

Following Asvetic's advice in an other forum (http://typophile.com/node/34024), this thread is mostly directed at David Bailey although -obviously- anyone is free to comment. Lately I've become very interested in the work of John Langdon & I've been trying to make an ambigram myself to add to my portfolio as well. With little succes so far, so if anyone can give links, advice, tips,... on how to get started it would be much appreciated. Just for the record, I do know the easiest way to get started is to study other ambigrams & start off your own by writing a copy of your desired word flipped 180° to see what forms you'd be working with. But there are more ambigrams than just the single 180° words. Any usefull information or nice links are welcome.

Linda Cunningham's picture

The link that was posted on http://typophile.com/node/33332 is pretty useful, and lets you do other things with it than "just one word."

ill sans's picture

I've only taking a quick glance at it now, but it certainly looks very useful. Thanks, Linda (and sorry for not having bothered to look through the archives ;-) ).

Andy Martin's picture

Having made a couple (not wonderful, but working) I can safely say it's flaming hard work. I tend to work from both ends in towards the middle. Break the letters down and see ifthey can be used as other letters.

Here are mine, they are in no way perfect, but they work. The Ninetwenty one was for a friend. The Weeman one is mine obviously.

Ninetwenty
http://www.putfile.com/pic.php?img=4198666

Weeman (with various working stages)
http://www.putfile.com/pic.php?img=4173589
http://www.putfile.com/pic.php?img=4179773
http://www.putfile.com/pic.php?img=4180100

I hope that helped.

timd's picture

I find a certain amount of calligraphy/blackletter study helps with making an ambigram, the swashes from calligraphy and blackletter has some basic constituent elements which reflect easily (that and recognising when an idea isn’t working). Another point is that it sometimes works against the final product if you try to make one letter directly into its opposite, in other words, parts of one character can be used to form parts of the rotated, neighbouring characters.
Post a sketch maybe somebody will have an idea/advice.

Tim

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