(x) Preen magazine nameplate and titles - ITC Serif Gothic, based on Carousel/Firenze {Lex, Justin Kaye}

Scott D's picture

Dear Type Savants,

I recently came across a fashion magazine that does *not* use Didot and/or Avant Garde. Instead, the designer(s) employs a kind of retro-cheesy-yet-appealing combination of typefaces. (At least they're trying something different.) I know the faces, but I can't identify them. It's making me crazy.

Specifically:

  1. The masthead. Though I know the swash and spacing are likely custom.
  2. And this display face, used in various weights throughout.

I've ruled out Normandy or Poster Bodoni for the masthead, as well as Bernhard Gothic or Penumbra Flare for the display. Any ideas?

Lex Kominek's picture

The display face is ITC Serif Gothic Black

- Lex

Scott D's picture

Lex, you are absolutely right. Thank you. And it figures that a fashion magazine can't get away from a Lubalin face. What's up with that?

The more I look at the masthead, the more it appears to be custom. Though I bet it started as a didone.

kuroneko's picture

1. something like a pimped Bodoni Bold
2. ITC Serif Gothic Black

justinthomaskay's picture

for the masthead on Preen i used an adapted version of Carousel/Firenze as a starting point and tweaked from there.

bowfinpw's picture

Nothing like getting the designer to give us the answer. Thanks for stepping in with the help.

- Mike Yanega

Scott D's picture

Justin, thanks for sharing. Preen has a healthy dose of originality. I think the type selections are right on.

justinthomaskay's picture

i actually just did the masthead with the studio im working for right now (helicopter). the preen peoples handles the rest themselves.

Scott D's picture

Nonetheless, the masthead adds flavor. Nice work.

moggy's picture

Been reading Typophile for ages now and it was a pleasant surprise to find a thread about Preen. Justin did a great job with the masthead – when I was burning the midnight oil laying out the magazine he swooped in and knocked out the logo. Huge life-saver.

The rest of the magazine uses Serif Gothic, Caslon, and a healthy dose of Fedra Sans. I must say, Serif Gothic is one of those typefaces you don't necessarily take notice of immediately, but even after 3 issues I can't wait to keep using it.

Syndicate content Syndicate content