MADType Releases Pacioli

matthew_desmond's picture

My latest release is part revival, part interpretation. It's a geometric display font based upon Luca Pacioli's 1509 alphabet of "divine proportion."

Luca Pacioli (1445-1514 or 1517) was an Italian mathematician and Franciscan friar who lived during the Renaissance. While he was the chairman of mathematics in Milan, he collaborated with and taught mathematics to Leonardo da Vinci.

He published his second important book "De divina proportione," in 1509. This book discussed topics including mathematical proportion, geometry, and architecture. Along with beautiful three-dimensional renderings by da Vinci, Pacioli included diagrams detailing the geometric construction of the Roman alphabet.

Read more at http://www.madtype.net

muzzer's picture

the O looks a bit thin. but looks pretty ok. good luck with it!

Muzz

Chris G's picture

Looks good.

Just to note, Giovanni Mardersteig also designed a set of titling capitals called Pacioli, for use at the Officina Bodoni. I don't know whether that warrants a name change, maybe someone more clued up on the potential rammifications could offer their take on the situation.

AzizMostafa's picture

Does these DTP letters belong to you Matthew_desmond?
http://www.desktoppublishingforum.com

matthew_desmond's picture

Muz, There are definitely some optical issues with the forms, but that is the result of being built by a mathematician and not an artist. I decided to keep it true to the original form rather than fixing things like that.

Chris, I wasn't aware of Mardersteig's capitals. I'm fairly certain that there are no other retail fonts currently on the market with the name pacioli, though.

Aziz, I don't think that is my version. The grid lines appear to be thicker.

dan_reynolds's picture

It might be Durer Caps from P22 –
http://www.p22.com/ihof/font.asp?font=durercaps&face=durercaps

Matt, if neither you nor the Mardensteigs have registered "Pacioli" as a trademark, there should be no legal problems in terms of your distributing a font by that name. If someone else has registered the name, they could claim infringement. You could register the name yourself, but you might have to prove that it could not be confused with any other typeface name.

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