"Invite" connected script typeface

elabdesigns's picture

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

AttachmentSize
Invite.jpg4.17 KB
Invite-2.jpg7.14 KB
bowfinpw's picture

If that's all you have to show us there is no evidence to prove this is not handwriting. The way the letters connect is very unlikely in a font.

- Mike Yanega

paul d hunt's picture

The way the letters connect is very unlikely in a font.

Mike, with the advent of OpenType, you can't really say that anymore.

James Scriven's picture

Im gonna go for Ministry Script, one of the many ligatures or substitutes. Just a guess though. You can "Flont" it at Veer.

http://www.veer.com/products/typedetail.aspx?image=UMT0000149#characters

bowfinpw's picture

Yes, Paul, I agree that OpenType has given the capability for a huge number of ligatures and other glyphs, but so far the number of these fonts is rather small, and not widely in use (partly because using them requires OT-smart applications). I was going more with the odds in making that comment.

If anyone has tried to see Ministry, as I just have, you find that when you type 'the' in Flont, you do get something joined, but not anything like the posted sample. If there is another form of this letter combination embedded in the font, how is one ever to know this without owning the font? From a buyer/IDer perspective this seems to be another disadvantage of the OT format. The number of puzzled comments I get from people who want to get Bickham Script Swashes, proves to me that there is a long way to go for OT acceptance and understanding.

I doubt that Ministry Script is the source of this, because the style seems not to agree with the sample, although I can't prove anything with what I can see on Veer. It would be much easier to make conclusions if we had a few more words in this lettering.

- Mike Yanega

Stephen Coles's picture

You can get the PDF from Veer, Mike. But you're right about the sampler. Two things need to happen for OpenType to gain wide acceptance:

1. Online samplers that incorporate features and full character sets. That's doable for the small foundries like Underware who can create animations and demos for each of their fonts, but the major resellers will have to plow a lot of R&D into their samplers to make them OT-savvy.

2. Microsoft support. The company that co-developed OpenType still doesn't fully support it in their flagship products, namely Office. While I would never design something in Word, the sad fact is that many still do. And an OpenType font with special features or characters can never work as a corporate font. That's a serious problem. Especially when you're talking about the basics, like figure variations and small caps.

elabdesigns's picture

Ive added an additional image. The Ministry script fonts looks promising, but with all the alternates, I need to take a closer look. In the meantime take a look at the second sample. Thanks.

paul d hunt's picture

but the major resellers will have to plow a lot of R&D into their samplers to make them OT-savvy.

couldn't they use LetterSetter like House Induestries does? (but i seem to be having trouble using it today, is it just me?)

and on topic: i don't believe this is Ministry.

paul d hunt's picture

it's Miss Le Gates from the Blumelin Scripts collection, most likely modified in Illustrator or a similar application to make it join up properly.

bowfinpw's picture

Nice work Paul!

- Mike Yanega

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