Getting rid of default Th ligs

Erik Fleischer's picture

I know this topic has come up before, but I think my question is a little different.

Robert Bringhurst says the default Th ligature in many Adobe OpenType fonts is "misclassified as basic". In order to get InDesign to apply all basic ligatures but not Th, one has to either edit every single Adobe OpenType font using a tool such as FontLab or use some sort of script to "undo" all Th ligatures but not the other basic ones.

I can write a little script, of course, but maybe somebody already has one, or can offer another simple solution to the problem (besides find/change)?

Miguel Sousa's picture

Gladly those ligatures are not as radical as these ones :)
Missed Opportunity for Ligatures

Erik Fleischer's picture

True, Miguel: there are worse things than Th ligatures.

As a typeface designer and member of the Adobe font development team, where do you stand on the default (rather than discretionary) Th ligature?

Miguel Sousa's picture

>where do you stand on the default (rather than discretionary) Th ligature?

Personally, that ligature doesn't bother me, so I'm fine with the type designer's decision of wanting it as default.

Nick Shinn's picture

Make a custom version of the font(s), using FontLab.
All that's required is to delete one line of code in the OpenType panel "liga" submenu.

sub T h by T_h;

dave bailey's picture

Are you sure the EULA allows modification?

Miss Tiffany's picture

Adobe's EULA does allow for personal modification.

The only time the Th ligature has bothered me is in display settings. For text settings it works, unlike a lot of ct and st ligatures.

dave bailey's picture

Agreed, I prefer the Th lig for text.

Erik Fleischer's picture

Make a custom version of the font(s), using FontLab.

That would be ideal, and I have edited some of my own fonts (the ones I use most). However, if you take the complete Minion Pro, Myriad Pro and Cronos Pro families, right there you have almost 150 files to edit. A few more Adobe Pro families (if you do work for a firm that has Portfolio 10) and you've become a full-time font patcher. And that's if the firm has FontLab.

Of course you can patch only the fonts you need to use (if that's a possibility), but I was hoping to find a simpler, less time-consuming solution. I think the bottom line is that such a solution doesn't exist.

Miguel Sousa's picture

>I think the bottom line is that such a solution doesn’t exist.

I believe you can dump the GSUB table, edit it, and replace the original table, without crack opening the font. But I can't think of a tool that you can use. Perhaps TTX.

Erik Fleischer's picture

I'd like to thank everyone for your time. Nick, reading my previous post again, I realize it may have seemed as if I was dismissing your suggestion, which wasn't my intention. For now I'll go on using find/change in InDesign.

Nick Shinn's picture

Erik, no worries.
I did actually run through the process I suggested, and it took me less than a minute to make the modified font (renamed "Munion"), install it, and check it in InDesign.

nickshanks's picture

why don't you just do a find/replace for t + h and insert a zero-width non-joiner?

Erik Fleischer's picture

why don’t you just do a find/replace for t + h and insert a zero-width non-joiner?

See my previous post (16 August, 2006 - 2:29pm). In InDesign, I find it easier to just do a find/change and set the character style of all Th pairs to not allow ligatures.

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