Wooden Typeface

duckman's picture

Hi,

Maybe someone could help me identify this wooden typeface. I wonder if there is a digital version of it.

Thank you,

Donald

Mark Simonson's picture

I don't have a specific ID for that, but, according to the Rob Roy Kelly book (American Wood Types), that general style was known as Concave Tuscan. Also, a lot of wood types didn't actually have names, only numbers.

bowfinpw's picture

Nick Curtis has a selection of wooden types at http://www.nicksfonts.com/, but none are very close to your sample. I also looked through the Solotype Catalog, to at least find a name, but this typeface only resembles a few types that were all upper case and more elongated. The other problem is that not much of the Solotype collection was digitized. The rights to the collection now belongs to Castcraft, so they claim.

duckman's picture

Thanks for the information. Is it in your opinion a typeface that belongs to the Solotype collection? Is there maybe a website of Castcraft?

bowfinpw's picture

Donald, Unfortunately I didn't see an exact match for this in the Solotype book. Castcraft site starts at http://www.castcraft-software.com/. It may take some hunting to find the information that they acquired the rights to Solotype. I have heard that inquiries to them may never be answered, so I can't give you a very positive feeling about dealing with them. Frankly, I think you would be best off just searching for Wood types, Tuscan types or Western types and seeing what is available. The closest resemblance to this I know is a font from the old FontBank colelction called Old West. It is an open face style, but I think it could be called concave tuscan too. You can see and buy it here.

mike_f's picture

You might check Woodentype Fonts too, if the site ever comes back
online. I visited it just last week; hopefully it will return. The fellow had
several Tuscans, although I don't recall if any matched your sample
image.

jim_rimmer's picture

Take a look at the wood-and-and metal type prints and posters done by Chris Stern of Grey Spider Press.

He works with wife Jules Faye, where they print in an old barn in Northern Washington state.

Chris has taken wood type broadsheets in a completely different and exciting direction. Every typopgrapher needs one of these sheets on the studio wall. (and I get three cents for every one I sell)

Find them at: www.sternandfaye.com

Jim

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