Sign language/ typographic logo

designalchemy's picture

This was a logo design I created back in 1995. I used rubylith to cut hand shapes, then scanned and vectorized. It was personal work I created for the book "The new typographic logo" (ISBN 0-942604-55-5) Notice the i is a 1. Small text is set in Neo by Segura.
\image {Un1ty.jpg}

hrant's picture

It looks "loose" for a logo. Is there a way to tie the hands together (and I don't mean using rope).

BTW, does the hand for "1" say "1", or "i"?

hhp

designalchemy's picture

The center hand is "i". Well is suppose with the advance of genetics and modern techniques there is properly a way to mutate these hands. I will have to check with the my fellow engineers at the lab.

Miss Tiffany's picture

or you could loosen them up (space them out) a bit more. i can see this as a logo... but more importantly or rather in addition (?) i can see it on something like a t-shirt as well.

the most interesting bit is that you cut these drawings in rubylith. that is the coolest part.

designalchemy's picture

Tiffany. You must be old school since you are familiar with rubylith. What type of work do you do and for how long have you beed doing it. Since you like the rubylith part you could properly appreciate that I did the who sign language in ruby. I was going to make digitize it for a full font out of it but never got it finished.

kentlew's picture

Tiffany, if you have fond memories of rubylith, you would probably enjoy listening to Dave Farey tell stories of cutting rubys for Letraset. That's how he cut his teeth, so to speak, in type. I think he used to give demonstrations at ATypI conferences. If I'm not mistaken, there was a plan to have him do a rubylith-cutting demo at this summer's TypeCon in Toronto, but at the last minute they couldn't get his scalpels through airport security. (We use off-the-rack X-actos here in the States, but Dave uses his own custom, hand-crafted blades.)

-- K.

glutton's picture

Ole --

Your use of a 1 is one of the few examples I have seen where I support swapping out a letter for a number, outside of <a href="http://www.restaurantflorent.com>Restaurant Florent</a>. Good thought.

glutton's picture

Ack, what happened to the hyperlinks?

hrant's picture

> they couldn't get his scalpels through airport security.

Hey, at CDG they wanted to confiscate my 2-year-old's kiddie fork. But when I demonstrated that my *keys* were more dangerous they let us keep it. (I think if it was Heathrow they would have just taken my keys too...)

hhp

Miss Tiffany's picture

Ole & Kent -- Let's just say that I remember having to show my spot color with rubylith (and amberlith). I grew up around the business and so it is a very nostalgic thing. But, seriously, you really had to have, still have to have, total control over your knife when using rubylith, especially if you don't want to cut the shapes off the backing material. -- Dave Farey's demo would be a nice thing to see, similar I would imagine, to seeing someone doing the one-two jerk of throwing metal type. Let's here for the craftsmen!

Miss Tiffany's picture

By the way -- Ole -- you really should complete your Sign Language face. I think it is a great idea, especially for manuals and books (?), perhaps.

hatz's picture

i like that you have used sign language to visualize your logo... but isn't there any sign for the word "unity" itself?.. i'm asking this, because for me a logotype should be something simple with a symbolic content to that thing it stands for... to me it's a little bit complicated... has it anything to do with people who are deaf?.. or is it just for the sake of "wandering on new paths"?..

carlstone's picture

I can appreciate the individual hands and spelling out the letters in sign language...but this doesn't hold together as a logo. I would suggest that "unity" implies the combination of site and sound and there are enough interesting charicatures to use them graphically. an example the dot over the eye could be and eye, the u or the y could be changed into sound type shapes.
but over all you want to have unity with site and sound. it goes hand in hand, eye to eye, and mouth to mouth. these are all important issues in comunication

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