TY (self identity)

Ty Wilkins's picture

TY (self identity)
This is a self identity logo I designed for myself to promote myself as a corporate identity/logo designer. The intended audience include potential clients and/or a potential employers. Any comments and suggestions are welcome. Thanks // Ty

hrant's picture

What is it saying?

I think you should emphasize the smirk (in size but not curvature), and maybe you can use it to break the monotony of the bounding box.

BTW, do you mind that it reminds of MacOS, and a legionnaire?

hhp

squeeze's picture

If you are treating this like a mark/icon vs. type, I would make a couple of tweaks

Ty Wilkins's picture

Hrant- The face is also a combination of two letterforms, the T and the Y (the T being stacked over the Y). After creating it, I did think of the Mac Os logo. I don't particularly care for that logo. I always find myself looking for a hidden meaning in the Mac Os logo that I never find.

Scott- I wasn't thinking of this as a mark/icon in place of type, but as a combination of both. I haven't tried many fluid/organic versions, but perhaps there would be some possibilities there. One of the reasons that it is currently so geometric is because I have often heard that a good logo should fit within a square (for reducing, placement, compactness, etc). But I'm open to ideas.

Thanks for the comments.

hrant's picture

> a combination of two letterforms

Oh, that makes sense.
Well, it's nice and subtle (although the legionnaire effect is there), but then the "Y" will need its tail.

> a hidden meaning in the Mac Os logo

"Don't think - be happy!"

hhp

popovich's picture

nice one. :D

Ty Wilkins's picture

Hrant- I'm not familiar with the term "legionnaire". I looked it up and found "n : a soldier who is a member of a legion (especially the French Foreign Legion) [syn: legionary]". Could you explain? Thanks // Ty

hrant's picture

I meant Roman legionnaire. But I guess their helmets
were noted for those "sideburns", and not the nose-guard:
http://store.daz3d.com/userdir/images/product.ps_tx253b.detail.jpg

Strangely enough, I have a book about helmets (for which I once paid way too much money for).
Here's what I'm talking about:

helmet.gif

The book says it's 11th century Moravian, but now I'm thinking that style is maybe Ancient Greek - maybe not Athenian though, more Spartan? Anyways, it's a helmet!! :-)

hhp

hrant's picture

Tying again...

helmet.gif

hhp

squeeze's picture

I do like your direction, but where did you hear the square thing? I can't say that I agree with the theory

Ty Wilkins's picture

Scott- I came across the "square theory" in my undergrad program. My professor for Corporate Identity said that often times logos have to fit within a square for their applications (corner of letterhead, homepage, business card, t-shirt pocket.) I don't believe, and I don't think my professor believed that this was a hard fast rule, but that it was a starting place, and to venture out meant you had a good reason. Another way I have often heard this idea described is that "a good logo should be able to roll down hill". So anything that fits nicely into a square, like a circle, would roll (probably much better than a square). I think the main purpose of this kind of thinking was to encourage designers to consider the application limitations of a logo that has extreme horizontal or vertical dimensions. But yeah, how boring would it be if all logos were square?

hrant's picture

There's certaintly a practical advatange to having a logo with close vertical/horizontal dimensions - but if anything that says "circle" to me. Plus it seems to me that this consideration is secondary to other things in a good logo, like memorability, which is not square at all. I think as long as one avoids extreme lopsidedness of dimensions, it's fine.

hhp

mica's picture

Slightly off-topic but... don't get so famous with your mark that Ty toys notices you.

Ty Wilkins's picture

Hrant, any suggestions in regards to curbing the legionnaire effect?

Everyone, any ideas on giving the T and the Y more distinct typographic traits?

andrew_baker's picture

I'd also like to see a more fluid, organic version.

Why not break some corners off your monolith and add curves? Might be more difficult to read the t and y, but hey! thats what makes logo's so fun.

here's a quickie.

Andrew

hrant's picture

> any suggestions in regards to curbing the legionnaire effect?

First make sure you want to get rid of it. And Andrew's great idea -but sans the handwriting ductus- makes me think that "softness" might be the key to that.

hhp

squeeze's picture

Try making some minor adjustments (i.e. round a corner or two, break the square with a corner or two, etc.)

Ty

Dan Weaver's picture

It still looks like a persons face with the eyes closed facing you with a smirk on its face. Maybe this is a good thing. I don't see a Ty anymore.

cerulean's picture

Does it look like you? If not, why not?

fuentes bo's picture

I think the first one (from TY), maybe with a bolder smile as Scott suggested is the better one. Try adding colour, that could help to remove the legionnaire effect.

Ty Wilkins's picture



Santiago-- What do you think about this?

fuentes bo's picture

Mmmm I was talking about filled shapes.
Try with and without outlines.
It

aquatoad's picture

Hi Ty.

Could you perhaps show a sampling of logos that you have done? It would help us get a sense of your style. What kind of clients/employers are you reaching out to?

I say all this because I don't particularly like this direction. Cute. Clever. But in my opinion missing the mark (as it were). My gut feeling is that this is one of those concept directions that looks so promising... but in the end is just about a smirking face. My suggestion would be to stow this idea for a bit, and try other things.

If you want to go with this direction, this will improve legibility (though changes the personality

Ty Wilkins's picture

Here are some logos I have done.



Ty Wilkins's picture

I am open to a variety of types of clients. So, unfortunately I don't specialize in theater identities. There are tons of other directions I have pursued for my self identity. I will try to post some next week.

beejay's picture

ty, that is some clever stuff. Bravo.

fuentes bo's picture

I like it very much!
I think your direction speaks a lot about your work, cute, clever and simple.
I see your logos and smile.

Dan Weaver's picture

Ty if you want real inspriation, check out the new VH1 logo there is a thread in design about it. Its a beautiful thing (NOT)

Ty Wilkins's picture

Randy - After seeing a few of my logos, do you think that this direction is appropriate?

One of the reasons I have been hesitant to break the box shape is because I think that's what makes it simple -- a twist on a simple geometric shape.

I'm open to comments.

dctroy's picture

Ty:
I think your original idea looks cool. Also good in the blue version you have above (although I don't think it works as well in reverse).

I like its simplicity and playfulness. I noticed both the "TY" letters and the face immediately, but if some people don't right away, I think that's okay too.

It also seems like it lends itself to embellishments for the sake of self-promo pieces in the future (I'm reminded of the old constantly changing MTV logo).

It seems sly without being silly/goofy.

The world is so annoyingly serious that it's nice to see something with a little wit.

aquatoad's picture

Hi Ty,

Thanks for posting the logos. They are nice, particularly Lucky 7 and Quote 66. After comparison, your mark does seem to be *on the money* with regards to your style, though I think possibly not as strong as the two mentioned above, but stronger than the 3rd example.

Many people here have responded positively, so don't let me discourage you. As I said, not my favorite logo, but what you do with it now will speak volumes also: type choice, stationary layout etc.

I just had an idea: what if you were to design your idenity around the concept of identity. You could make the top of your letterhead into a government form with a box for your thumbprint (actually print each one), lines for your name and info (hand write it in), etc. There would certainly be room for wit in a gov't form! Same for business card & envelope. If you didn't want to fill in by hand, you could type them (ahhhhh. with an actual typewriter). If you are like me, you probably won't go through huge amounts of stationary so the crafty approach could save cash. This would certainly be memorable if it came across my desk. Just a thought to consider.

Randy

cerulean's picture

Speaking of identity, have you considered my question? It's a great idea well-executed, making your name into a face, but it gives me a strong expectation of what you ought to look like if I were to meet you (as your clients surely will). If you're skinny with a narrow nose and arched brows, people may say, "Oh, sorry to disturb you, I was looking for Ty, is he here?" It's a flexible enough concept to be re-proportioned into a caricature assuming it isn't one already. Perhaps you could show us a photo?

Ty Wilkins's picture

Kevin - You have a good question. I'm not really sure how much my logo looks like me. People who know me well have said: "it even looks like you", but my guess is that they're thinking in terms of personality. Here's a photo:

squeeze's picture

Can you attach a larger picture? Just kidding.

There really is a resemblance. You have both a strong brow and a bit of a snear in your smile.

Ty Wilkins's picture

Here's a side-by-side comparison of the MacOs logo and mine. Any comments?

Ty Wilkins's picture

Randy, here is another direction I have experimented with. What do you think about this one?

Anyone else have an opinon?

dylan's picture

I didn't have any grand hangups with the first image posted, Ty. The type was really subtle. So much so that I started to picture how the rest of the ID would shape up. Perhaps your first name had some emphasis over the last. Or maybe not.

I think the Apple logo isn't worth worrying about

cerulean's picture

Putting on my caricaturist hat for the moment, I agree you're most of the way there, but for a closer resemblance I would alter it thus:
Rectangle Ty
Find your compromise as you see fit, naturally...

dylan's picture

Nice touch, Kevin. It's close...

I'm seeing a swell display typeface in there... something for you to do in your spare time, Ty.

:P

Ty Wilkins's picture

How about this?

dylan's picture

I think you're down to personal preference as far as the proportions. Ah, one more thought: Would it be any benefit to allow the bottom two corners to be *slightly* rounded?

Thinking out loud...

aluminum's picture

...I think that might help both with the 'face' shape and to better define the 'y'.

That said, it's a good mark as-is.

Ty Wilkins's picture

Here's two different approaches to rounding out the bottom.

dylan's picture

Vote: the one on the right. You're done. Congratulations. Nice work.

hrant's picture

Yeah, the right one is it!

hhp

drive_by's picture

i agree, you nailed it with the one on the right.

squeeze's picture

Me too!

down's picture

Strange how a simple curve on the bottom completes the design.

fuentes bo's picture

Yeah, it is the best.

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