In praise of T.26

cheshiredave's picture

As I had posted in another thread some months back, I was looking for a typeface family to use for the posters and other publications of my theater company. After a lot of deliberation (and one purchased license that didn't work out as well as I'd hoped), I chose Neil Summerour's Aaux and Aaux Office. Before I bought them, though, I tried them out on T.26's lettersetter, and it seemed like there wasn't a set of real quotes in Aaux (single or double). I wrote to T.26, asking them about it, and they responded that yes, indeed, Aaux did contain real quotes. So I bought it (and Office).

I was pretty disappointed to find out that the open- and closed-double-quotes were identical to each other, and completely vertical, making them almost undistinguishable from the standard double primes/hashmarks (let's not start that terminology discussion again, please). Same thing for the single quotes.

I wrote to T.26 telling them of my disappointment, and that I really felt it was unusable as a serious text face if it didn't have real quotes (Aaux Office has them, but I didn't want it as my main text face).

Amazingly, the next morning I received a new Aaux, with the quotes angled. Perfectly usable now. T.26 really came through, and it made me all the more grateful for them and other small foundries where the people behind them understand and sympathize with other designers' needs.

Thanks, T.26 -- you rock!

(Side note: I also wrote to Neil Summerour to express my appreciation for Aaux/Aaux Office, and asked him about the possibilities of a black weight and small caps/OSFs. He replied to say that they're currently in the works. No definite due date, but it sounds like there could be some developments this summer. Score!)

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