(x) Molitoris slanted serif on business card - Adobe Serif {Yves, J. Edward Sanchez}

refusenik's picture

The top line looks like TNR skewed to me, the rest looks more like some sort of Garalde, but let's face it: I'm lost and I need the help of pros, such as the good people of the Typophile Type ID Board. Have at it please! Any assistance is much appreciated.

Bald Condensed's picture

I'm very sorry, but this is Adobe Serif, the substitution fonts that automatically kicks in whenever the intended font cannot be found.

Spire's picture

Could be Adobe Serif?

That's one of the "generic" substitution faces built into Adobe Acrobat.

refusenik's picture

Ok. Wow. That would explain, why I couldn't find anything like it.

*blank_stare*

Now why would anyone go and print their business cards in Adobe Serif? And (much more to the point) what font was it *supposed* to be set in? And how come nobody noticed, when it wasn't?

Mysteries upon mysteries, I shall go and investigate, thanks for your help, everyone!

Bald Condensed's picture

> Now why would anyone go and print their business cards in Adobe Serif? And (much more to the point) what font was it *supposed* to be set in? And how come nobody noticed, when it wasn’t?

Exactly. The number of times I've asked myself those exact questions. People just don't notice (or they don't care).

fmiles's picture

They don't notice.

I witnessed an incident that involved two headings printed on paper — one in Arial and the other in Times New Roman. When I asked why the person had changed the title font inside the document, the only thing he noticed was that the Times heading was larger (it was a higher level heading), made it a little smaller and bold, printed it again and was happy.

For him, “font” meant the size and they both looked identical to him when bolded (they were all caps, by the way).

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