University Gallery Type

jupiterboy's picture

Looking for suggestions for a face to cover the basic needs of a university gallery. My old school needs some help so I'm going to attempt to assist. The director likes letterpress, so we are off on a good foot.

Needs would be signage on walls (largest), wall texts, invitations, postcards and brochures for exhibits.

I've set the gallery name in Dolly bld, and like the idea of a serif that is versatile with a little flavor, but feel the bold would fare better at large sizes than the small caps.

They are using Akzidenz Grot at the moment.

Looks like Freight could be very useful for this application.

Also, newsprint stock may be in the mix as a low-cost option for some publications.

jupiterboy's picture

What’s the record for reads without a response? Is there something on my shoe?

Maybe I should ask about observed trends in gallery identities, and what people feel is appropriate. I can see a need to be somewhat neutral as a background for the art.

dezcom's picture

What kind of gallery are you talking about?

ChrisL

jupiterboy's picture

It’s an art gallery associated with a university. It is in a museum district on the ground floor of a medical complex. It is a small space that will be used by curatorial students. Typically the focus will be on works by artists associated with the university. The current show is called "Symbiotic" and features the work of grads and ex-students that work in local museums. The writing is also covered by grads and ex-students that work in the editorial and art writing end of the museum district.

Nick Shinn's picture

I'd approach this from the starting point of the captions in a catalogue.
I've always loved that typography -- where you get the title of the artwork, the artist, the work's dimensions, etc. It's hardcore geek typography where you get to fool around with the interplay of roman, italic, small caps, and figures.

So if your client is into the letterpress thing, Bembo was the primo face for that kind of setting. I'm not saying use Bembo, but just follow that old-school vibe. As one of the first digital sans faces to include a full set of expert features, I've used Scala Sans for that sort of thing, and it works very well. But there are so many more faces now.

Of my own, I would recommend Bodoni Egyptian; not a sans, but a slab-serif face may be a good candidate for "neutral". And Thin weights look good big on a wall.

http://www.shinntype.com/Assets/Bodoni_GIFS/Bod.pdf

dezcom's picture

Take a look at Formata.

ChrisL

jupiterboy's picture

I have a real affinity for the slab. Thanks for the suggestions. Everything is a bit larval now, but I will post an idea without too much explanation, and a few pics of the space.




That last item is a newsprint piece a bit smaller than 10 x 14 ".

Nick Shinn's picture

Hmm. That's modern, ennit. And the director is into letterpress?

jupiterboy's picture

To clarify, she had seen work for the Chinati foundation designed by Rutger Fuchs that was letterpress. After some light discussion of budget she also mentioned the newsprint.

The Kimbell next door uses Bembo if I'm not mistaken. I'm thinking the letterpress might come to pass later when more of the grants are in, but I'm trying to steer in economical directions, and help create an identity.

It is a student gallery, which serves a very different purpose than the lofty institutions that surround it.

Thanks again for any input. I don't have peer review. Current feedback = modern.

hrant's picture

All kinds of people like letterpress (for different reasons), not just fetishists.

BTW, at those large sizes, I'd probably iron out all
those optical corrections (like in the join of the "t").

hhp

jupiterboy's picture

Letterpress to me was a simple good omen, a sign of a desire for something good and less easy.

Hrant. Can I impose and ask for an explanation of optical corrections? Is it that the “t” extends farther to the right, etc?

Anyway, I should start this again when I get it out of the oven. I'm looking at Formata now, and need to rethink things with a sans as well because that is probably where it will end up. Thanks all. More suggestions welcome. I'll look at them all.

hrant's picture

No imposition at all. I mean how the connection between the stem and the bar in the "t" is "pinched", like a tight belt (especially on top). And the top of the (closed) bowl of the "a" seems to have a small trap.

But really, it depends on the effect you want - you might think those
features (although the latter trap, unlikely) are part of the "look".

hhp

jupiterboy's picture

Ok. This is a book face. IMO (and also stated by the designer) the bold makes a nice display. I see the quirks as process clues, like seeing an artists fingerprint in paint or seeing sketch lines under paint. My biggest reservation about this face is that it has some of these issues, and particularly the small caps, which looks so nice in smaller sizes, seems too much at display sizes (not easy to see in my example).

I think the bowl of the “a” would benefit from refinement. I don't know if I have the chops to work out the “t” and actually improve it for display. I think I've got the hots for Dolly bold really. A clear sign I need to leave her and take a night off.

Cheers,

Mark

hrant's picture

> process clues

Yes (and a nice expression). Which would make it a great idea for a
project related to type design, but hard to think for anything else.

hhp

jupiterboy's picture

I think it was a Kiefer interview where he talks about covering up what seemed mistakes and getting to a point where he felt good leaving those parts visible, showing the workings and false starts. I don't think ink traps in any way are false starts, but when you blow type up like that you see what it is made of, which isn’t a bad thing. Something to notice for those that care. Not much for those that don’t.

hrant's picture

You have a point.

hhp

jupiterboy's picture

Thanks again to all.

Hrant, I patched up the letters a bit (although I'll keep working with them).

Chris, I've paired Formata with Dolly to solve my small caps problem. It also gives the variety I was missing for heads and subheads, and the expert will cover any remaining bases on wall text and who knows what else may come along.

I'm feeling much better.

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