Times New Roman

Indices : Typefaces : Times New Roman

THE ubiquitous typeface of the second half of the 20th century. Developed by for The Times of London in 1931 (first used in October 1932) and generally attributed to Stanley Morison (not least by himself, in A Tally of Types). There is some debate about its origin. In A Tally of Types Morison himself said that he had 'pencilled the original drawings' and handed them to Victor Lardent, a draftsman in the Times' publicity department, who had produced finished drawings, which had then been worked on by the Monotype drawing office. When A Tally of Types was revised in 1973 a sceptical note was added, suggesting that it was likely that Lardent had carried out the actual design work based on some samples of Plantin that Morison had supplied. More recently, some have claimed it is the work of one Starling Burgess.

With the advent of the personal computer, Times New Roman and similar fonts based on the same model have become a standard default typeface in many applications.

For more info about the disputed origin listen to the interview with Mike Parker on typeradio.org. www.typeradio.org/loudblog/

Discussion:
Display Font with Times New Roman
Times New Roman's Many Versions!
Alternative to Times New Roman

Additional Articles:
Wikipedia: Times New Roman
The history of the Times New Roman typeface

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