What is a good font to represent freezing and quickness?

mystic's picture

What is a good font to represent freezing and quickness?

aluminum's picture

Unless you are looking for some sort of novelty font (like one with icycles hanging off of it) the font, itself, doesn't usually have that literal of a meaning. It's more to do with how you use it than the specific typeface.

mystic's picture

Yeah, I don't want anything lame like icicles. I'm making a logotype for a freezer company. They just have a warehouse where they freeze things for people. They wanted to advocate that they did things quickly, hence why I wanted a typeface that advocated frost and speed.

I'm still not really sure what I want to do for the logo type. Any of the obvious stuff is taken by competitors. In fact, all of their competitors are some shade of blue, from teal to like navy blue. They mentioned that they wanted some kind of stainless steel look, but even their largest competitors is already doing that. So my main focus was to do something very different and unique for them. Something to really set them apart from the rest of the competition.

Some of their competitors use snow on top of the letters and it looks really, really gay. Others have like snowmans and stuff. It's just so unprofessional and ugly looking.

Pretty much the best competitor is this site:
http://www.versacold.com/template.asp?pageID=5#warehouseserv

Miss Tiffany's picture

Freeze = Stop
Speed = Motion

Hmm. Quandary. What about something like Convecta or Quantum which could both hint at the idea of an ice cube or rather carved into ice?

aluminum's picture

Some of their competitors use snow on top of the letters and it looks really, really gay.

Please don't explain it that way to the client. ;o)

Again I don't think you'll find a specific typeface that 'says' fast or cold. In fact, I'm not sure if the logotype even needs to 'say' that. It really is just a mark to represent the company. The marketing and branding of the company should say that, with the logotype simply being the mark used to label all of that.

Eric_West's picture

Cooper Black

dan_reynolds's picture

Cooper Black

Huh? I always thought of Cooper Black as warm and fuzzy. I think that slab serifed egyptiennes can be quite cold.

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www.typeoff.de

Norbert Florendo's picture

Creating a freezing quick logo using a typeface alone might not do it. What I mean is, there may be something potentially interesting in the actual letters used in spelling whatever the word or name is.

When I create a logo I look at specific characters within what's being spelled, be it a word or initials. When you create a memorable and recognizable logo, you sometimes rely on the uniqueness of individual characters and not the whole typeface.

Sometimes replacing or modifying one of the characters makes it sing.
Maybe instead of trying to look freezing it could look ultra futuristic giving it a super high-tech feel. Being literal is not always creative.

Just for a trial reaction, spell the name out using the EPCOTT or DECOTECH fonts available on the Disney Experience site: http://www.disneyexperience.com/fonts.htm

or SPACE AGE at MickeyAvenue Fonts:
http://www.mickeyavenue.com/fonts/spaceage/

See if that melts their popcicle!
---------------------------------
Yes, I'm old, but I'm back in style!

timd's picture

There was a Chank font called Polar Bear – cold and fast.

Eric_West's picture

Dan,

JOKE

Eric

dan_reynolds's picture

sorry… :(

Hairline fonts strike me as cold, too BTW (not a joke)

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www.typeoff.de

William Berkson's picture

Check out the heavier weights of Armada. The blockiness of this might work for you.

Jan Sandvik's picture

Refrigerator , and not just for the name.

ben millen's picture

As well as the two previous suggestions, picking something somewhat angular could work well as it might speak to the crystaline nature of ice without having to be incredibly literal (icicles etc). i can't think of any examples however..

mystic's picture

Thanks for the font suggestions. I'll try and incorporate some logos and post them up in that section of the forum. The name of the company is called Windsor Freezer btw. It's not the most original name in the world because the first name is just the City we live in. It looks kind of long when you put both the words together side-by-side.

hrant's picture

Does Eras have a condensed?

hhp

cerulean's picture

Ah, well the name changes everything. It has the word "wind" in it. Quick, freezing wind. You need a script. Something with swashes and 'scenders whipping all over the place.

mystic's picture

Ahh, cool. I guess I never thought of that. However, Windsor is still pretty generic and others probably have used that wind effect in the title (it's still an average size city).

They also wanted to convey "clean", "fresh" and maybe incorporate stainless steel (not my recommendation since competitors do it), blue water and "white"

They also suggested using an iceberg cracking into a sheet of ice water, but I'm not skilled enough to draw something like that, even if it just a simple 2-color line drawing in Macromedia Freehand.

What do you mean exactly by swashes and 'scenders? I don't really know what you mean by that. I'll play with your suggestions and see what I come up with. Thanks!

ebensorkin's picture

Maybe an industrial font - Something chunky - or even a boldish UNIVERS - combined with a snowfake would work nicely. The rough & tough against the delicate. Then it could be a one color design - white knoock out text with a blue flake. my 2 cents.

Dan Weaver's picture

egervari, how good are you in photoshop? Using styles you could make a cold clean logo.

http://share.studio.adobe.com/Default.asp

Go over to Adobe Studio Exchange and check out the Photoshop styles.

cerulean's picture

I meant the sort of scripts whose capitals, ascenders, and descenders have enormous loops that overlap and span whole words, thus evoking a swirling storm. Not sure what you might find that seems cold enough, though. Upon reflection, your client probably wouldn't like my idea anyway.

How about Handel?

hrant's picture

An italic snowflake?

hhp

ebensorkin's picture

With an industrial client - tastfulness is probably not an issue - an italic snowflake with Chunky type might be just the kind of sick predictable hybrid logo they LOVE. On the other hand it could be awesome in a designers republic sort of way.

jupiterboy's picture

Well, unfortunately speaking from experience, it is difficult to take the high road on things like this. That being said, there is a different aesthetic maybe to look for.

Ice can be delicate like a flake or hard and blocky. Some of the type suggested hits that blocky note. I know an ital Serpentine bold can work like that, but haven't we all seen enough of that. Solid and cold and fast maybe?

Also Officina Serif bold ital with some illustrative exageration can do what you need.

mystic's picture

illustrative exageration?

Lex Kominek's picture

I'd like to suggest Berthold City (bold) as a possible candidate.

- Lex

ebensorkin's picture

What do you like about that one? It has a certain pig iron qulaity to it - tough & so on. But is it chilly?

grod's picture

how about http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/scriptorium/platthand/ ? A little work in illustrator and it can be made to look like lines and swirls in ice, for clarity you'd need to adjust the swashes and make the word itself appear darker. The for that industrial look something blocky with back turing serifs ... can't think of an example... totally different and should convey the concept.

ebensorkin's picture

hee hee - frozone.

:-)

William Berkson's picture

You might be able to use frost, as opposed to snow or icicles, in a non-corny way. There are photos on the internet as well as fractal recreations of frost that might give you ideas.
Here's another photo. Frost can be incredibly varied in look and sometimes quite beautiful. If you have swash caps, the ends might turn into frost - like frozone! Sometimes the most obvious is best, if well executed. Another way is to have Windsor solid and Freezer outlined with the frost inside, in a fat face like FF Trademarker fat.

I don't know, they may look awful, or great. You could try.

ebensorkin's picture

I like this idea. It is probably to subtle for an industrial client. But I like it.

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