Simple personal logo

elliot100's picture

Hi there, I would be very grateful if you could take the time to make a few comments about the personal logo I'm trying to put together.

I wanted to:

1. Show my initials "EM" only
2. Play on "em" as a unit of measure in print and web
3. Keep the logo as simple and rational as possible in line with my own approach
4. Use only my own work - i.e. avoid adapting an existing typeface

So I have been experimenting with grid-based letters inscribed in a square.

Having come up with the first logo in the attachment, I can't say I'm happy - particularly with the "e" and wonder if the whole thing works better with just the "m" - cf the second logo in the attachment.

What do you think? Do I need to drop the very strict grid?

AttachmentSize
em1.gif2.86 KB
Miss Tiffany's picture

Your wants seem to have been met. Using the idea of the "em" is fun, and it will be a gee whiz moment for anyone that actually understands it. They both work, but the single m seems more interesting to me. Are these your first comps or do you have others which you could share?

cerulean's picture

How about a positive "e" to the left, mostly outside the square, set as it normally would be to read the word "em"?

elliot100's picture

Thanks for your input. That's all I have at the moment but will try the "e" outside the square and maybe post back here when I can.

cheers!

krisdisk's picture

I like the simplicity. I suggest trying other font though, the idea is good, keep the 'em' thing. You should try a hundred different combinations. Heck, even handwritten typo. Keep on going with them designs. It's easy to just streamline 2 letters in a cool font. Try lineto.com and type the 'em' in the typewriter to see the result. Other typesite have preview possibilities too.

K.

Fredrik's picture

I think the single 'm' looks more interesting, but retaining the 'em' is more interesting as an idea.
What about using two squares and placing each letter in its own? See how the neg space of the square changes by the placement and shape of the letter.

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