Cyrillic Circumflex accent

agisaak's picture

I've noticed that many Adobe fonts include a character called circumflex.cyr as a variant of spacing circumflex which appears as an inverted, cyrillicized breve. However, I can't find any examples of a circumflex accent actually appearing in cyrillic. Can someone explain to me when this character is used? Is this intended as a spacing version of U+0484 COMBINING CYRILLIC PALATALIZATION, or is this used for something else?

André

Michel Boyer's picture

André

Maybe you can make sense of what Alexej Kryukov says in this Fontforge thread.
Note that his font Old Standard uses /cyrflex % U+F6D5.
It seems to me that cyrflex and circumflex.cyr are two names for the same entity as I gather from the link http://texdoc.net/texmf-dist/doc/fonts/poltawski/goadb100.nam

Michel

Thomas Phinney's picture

It's just an alternate form of the breve used for Cyrillic. Not sure why it is labeled as a circumflex in some fonts, but I suspect the later versions correct that.

Michel Boyer's picture

The sentence that struck me in Kryukov's argumentation was

In fact, cyrflex should be treated as a spacing version of uni0311 (inverted breve) rather than as a special modification of circumflex.

The next sentence mentions its use for Serbian.

The Adobe glyph list http://sourceforge.net/projects/aglfn.adobe/files/ now contains cyrflex;F6D5 (PUA) whereas F6D5 is called circumflex.cyr in this other file on the Adobe site ...typblography/charsets/aw2_plus_cyr.txt.

Michel Boyer's picture

I am still puzzled by the naming. I understand that the Adobe convention is that a character name followed by a period and some extension names a variant of that character. So, clearly, “circumflex.cyr” was not appropriate. If I rely on the wiki on Serbo Croatian phonology, the inverted breve corresponds to a long vowel with a falling tone, clearly not a variation of something “breve” i.e. short (should we understand that “inverted breve” = “inverted short” = “long”?). So maybe “cyrflex” was chosen to remind us of the Greek circumflex that looks the same.

Added: the relation with the Greek circumflex is confirmed by what is said in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inverted_breve#Serbo-Croatian

agisaak's picture

Thanks, everyone. So it would seem that this character is intended for use in Serbian, and should really be called "space_uni0311.cyr" rather than "circumflex.cyr". My confusion stemmed largely from the fact that it seemed odd to include a *spacing* modifier in a font when no precomposed characters in the font make use of it as a component. And, until I read the links provided by Michel, I hadn't been able to find any examples of cyrillic characters which made use of either a circumflex or an arch (=inverted breve).

Thanks for the links,

André

Syndicate content Syndicate content