What is your take on the letter "A" without crossbar?

Jean Louis's picture

Is it ok to use it to simplify a logo, give it some sophistication, or do you associate it with specific values or identity?

I think it works, as in this case http://www.victoriabeckham.com/

riccard0's picture

I don’t associate it with a specific identity… mainly because it has been done innumerable times.
(just to pick an example somewhat opposite to yours: Samsung)

Jean Louis's picture

Of course, riccard0, didn't even think of that one. In some cases, it can look tacky or at least cliché, that's why I'm curious to have the opinion of people here.

Nick Shinn's picture

I always read it as Lambda.
KIA = KIL.
I wouldn’t say I’m typical, though!

quadibloc's picture

I think it's OK in decorative logos, but, yes, for other purposes, like alphabet reform, it would be lambda. Or some sound related to V.

grubstreet's picture

This sort of thing should go along well with other high-contrast serifs. I just found an image that could be a good example – see below.
Beautifully done. The modern high-contrast serif typeface goes very well with the overall ambience of the album cover (and the actual song).

Jean Louis's picture

What about this one? It's by the "world's largest independent design consultancy".

I might consider this "A" on a Gotham based logo. Capital sin?

Maxim Zhukov's picture

And now you have a Xi (Ξ) there too…

Major Major's picture

I think if the crossbar is going to be removed it should be done for a valid reason, and not because the designer didn't have any better ideas. Victoria Beckham kind of skirts the line, but I guess it can be justified by the fact that the crossbar-less A at the the end of "VICTORIA" acts as an inversion of the initial V and sort of book-ends the name, creating a natural break with "BECKHAM". But perhaps I'm stretching.

As always, it depends on the particular execution and whether it's done well or badly.

Jean Louis's picture

You're right Captain, after all it's in the execution. In the case of VB, I think it's well done. Not only was there a reason to remove the crossbars, the logo is used modestly, you only see it on the homepage.

Jean Louis's picture

I'm exploring the use of a crossbarless A here: http://typophile.com/node/118252 It's the logo critique you've posted on before.

donshottype's picture

Occasionally a crossbarless _A_ might suggest that a word has ancient roots in Greek. But contemporary readers who recognize Greek letters are almost non existant.
So usually a word with a crossbarless _A_ suggests the opposite of ancient. Perhaps "ad Astra" the face of the future.
In any case, the crossbarless _A_ is now such a design cliché that I would be reluctant to use it for anything that does not have an ultra sleek, high tech or futuristc character. Even there, it's in the "been there, done that" category.
Don

Jean Louis's picture

Thanks donshottype, unfortunately you're right about the cliché. Would you mind to take a took at this logo "sketch"? http://www.typophile.com/node/118252 (Scroll down in the post for recent version.) I hoped I could outmanoeuvre the cliché, but alas.

Té Rowan's picture

I tend to think of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration over in the USA, which, for a while, used a lettered logo with a crossbarless A. IIRC, Larabie based the font Nasalization on that.

http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/features/symbols-of-nasa.html

Jean Louis's picture

Thanks for your reply Té Rowan. Yes, it works for them as a space company. I guess they're one of those cases that can avoid the cliché. It also doesn't look like they're trying too hard to be sophisticated. They're Nasa, period :-)

donshottype's picture

Jean Louis please see my comment on http://www.typophile.com/node/118252 on that thread.
Don

Jean Louis's picture

@donshottype: Thank you!

Vladimir Tamari's picture

Good heavens I *am* getting too old I had no idea NASA stopped using the crossbarless A logo in 1995!

Té Rowan's picture

That makes two of us.

Jean Louis's picture

Not a very exciting logo, but it works here. Maybe softened by the O above

Jean Louis's picture

Not convinced on this one:

Té Rowan's picture

They do have an excuse there in that they resemble the mountain peaks nearby.

Jean Louis's picture

@Té Rowan: You're right, though I'm not a big fan of these literal evocations. I must admit I appreciate the logo more, now that I have seen its evolution since the 20's. They later added the snow cap, and reorganized the words.

donshottype's picture

In my opinion the Sugar Beach Logo is quite appropriate. Here are the real volcanic peaks, known as the pitons:


Don

Jean Louis's picture

@donshottype: Consistent, still I prefer the location above the logo.

Jean Louis's picture

This one, yes: http://www.bahlly.com/ Also the warmth of the colours on the website.

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