Yet another type anatomy chart...

Textwrapper's picture

I'm updating my type anatomy chart. I've included some odd sorts just for fun, and I used the jocular "octothorp" for the hashtag. Any suggestions would be welcomed and considered.

http://carsonparkdesign.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/type-anatomy.pdf

donshottype's picture

Good stuff. _Spur_ should have a more explicit example.
Don

quadibloc's picture

In addition to the octothorp, other obscure named symbols include the solidus (/), and the asterism, recently discussed in this forum.

Textwrapper's picture

Perhaps I should mix typefaces, but I thought that it would be great if I could get away with Goudy Oldstyle and Italic exclusively. They seem to have just about every anatomical feature going for them. Good call on the solidus. I'll add a fraction.

quadibloc's picture

In searching for information about the bullet point, I learned something new: that the paragraph mark is called the 'pilcrow'. Also, a fleuron used as a paragraph divider is sometimes called a 'hedera' (at least when it is in the form of an ivy leaf, the meaning of that word).

donshottype's picture

For an example of hedera in a font http://typophile.com/node/117364
and a font with 148 other variations http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/lanston/ltc-vine-leaves/ltc-vine-leaves/
Don

hrant's picture

And then there's the typographic manicule/fist...

BTW the most important thing about a good pilcrow goes unmentioned in that HTF article: that it must look heavier than the rest of the font, so that it can do its intended –or at least typical– job.

hhp

Fournier's picture

¶ Some lower cases have spurs: see "b, q".

¶ Spurs are found in some Old Style, Transitional, Scotch Roman and Slab Serif and Grotesque/Neo-Grotesque Sans.

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