rounded, sans serif

giuli's picture

Font: 
Lacrima Senza
Solved By: 

Comments

bowfinpw's picture

This resembles the mechanical lettering of devices like the Leroy Automatic Lettering Machine. Nick Curtis has a 3-weight font called Planscribe that is based on the output using the Leroy device. It is not an identical match, but its feeling is similar.

I could not find a more similar font.

- Mike Yanega

donshottype's picture

Your image resized and with contrast enhanced


Like Mike I saw the results of a lettering machine, but none of the digital ones AFAIK has this G. I also drew a blank by an extensive review of sans-serif fonts with rounded ends.
Any information as to where you saw this?
Don

DPape's picture

Looks like: Meyer, Alexander/LacrimaMG-SenzaBold
http://www.milieugrotesque.com/typeface-lacrima

bowfinpw's picture

Wow. Nice catch Dick! I never heard of them before.

- Mike Yanega

donshottype's picture

Good find Dick! Always a good idea to check the boutique publishers like Milieugrotesque that are not at Myfonts.
BTW this is a most peculiar font, sans for the upper case, serif for the lower case, both monoline. Does the "Senza" in the name stand for the hybrid nature of the font?
I gather that it is based on the typewriter font in an IBM Selectric typeball or element [what Milieugrotesque calls a golfball] designed in the years when IBM was a real design powerhouse. These designs are a goldmine for digital font makers.
On refection, a hybrid font is an elegant solution for the problems of a monospaced/typewriter font. The serifs on the lower case help to fill the fixed space. The absence of serifs on the uppercase means that the there is less of a horizontal squeeze on the letters to make them fit the fixed space. But this is speculative, as it seems that the original IBM font was only provided as an serifed italic.
Don

giuli's picture

Wow, thanks a lot Dick!
it was used on a zine called ''the burninig sand'' (vol.3)

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