Used for Benetton brand name

dumiaty's picture


Would be great if you guys could identify both of them.

Thanks a lot.

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Comments

donshottype's picture

No distinctive letters to be definitive, but the letters in the top line show no difference that I can see from Mark Simonson's Proxima Nova Soft Bold http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/marksimonson/proxima-nova-soft/
Don

donshottype's picture

Not as close a Proxima Nova Soft Bold, but with a similar flavor Houschka Rounded http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/g-type/houschka-rounded/ The B is different, the E is too wide, and the weight falls between Houschka Rounded Bold and Houschka Rounded Extra Bold
Don

bojev's picture

Or it could just be Arial Rounded Bold

donshottype's picture

>Or it could just be Arial Rounded Bold
The _O_ is not close enough to the almost perfect circle of BENETTON and the N is too narrow. Same problems with Helvetica rounded.
As for the dotted outline, this remains unmatched.
Don

donshottype's picture

You might be able to make the dotted line version by editing Proxima Nova Bold in Illustrator based on this tutorial http://www.creativebeacon.com/dotted-stroke-in-illustrator/
I was able to make a somewhat matching image this way, but the vector base font was unchanged. Seems to be a learning curve here.
Don

dumiaty's picture

Great, thank you guys!
Proxima Nova Soft Bold did the job well.
Dotted stroke tutorial was a plus.

Thanks again. :)

donshottype's picture

Here is a progress report on my attempt to use the dotted stroke technique in Illustrator. Used a couple of letters from Proxima Nova and set them at 72 points. Used Transform/scale 800%. Opened Window/Stroke. Set width at 10 pixels. Checked dotted line box & set stroke length and gap both at 10 pixels. Got rid of the fill so had an image that looked like an outline consisting of small boxes. Zoomed so that the two letters filled a fair part of the screen. Did a screen grab. Pasted into a paint program -- I used an old one, Paint Shop Pro 7, which works as well as Photoshop for these jobs and is a lot less complicated. Cropped the image. Reduced colors to 2. Saved as tif. Opened image in an old version of Scanfont. Placed it into a font. Saved the font. Opened in Fontlab. Edited the little boxes and reduced scale -- in this case it was from about 6000 pixels to 700 for an O. Did not bother to do the other letters but the technique would produce a font with the effect of dotted BENETTON. Time consuming! But works and a skill worth learning. On balance, I doubt I would bother to produce more than a few letters for a logo using this technique.
p.s. A perfectionist might replace the little boxes -- which are awkward to do right on curved strokes -- with little circles.
Don

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