The Concept of Stripping Down the Black Terminals?

Fournier's picture

Previously, I started a thread about The Concept of Stripping Down the Serifs.
Now, let's go back to time, back to the Middle Age.
I still wonder who first conceives sans serif typefaces based on blackletter calligraphy? Should I say Blackletter Sans, in other words, blackletter without terminals.
William Morris, Rudolf Koch or Tom Carnase and his Honda?
Some recent designers work and exploit geometric moduls combined with a heavy weight which give the flavor of blackletter: see Trigot or Griffensee.
Fell free to give your interpretation. Thanks for your input.

Té Rowan's picture

The vulgar name for them in Germany was/is "Schaftstiefelgrotesk", as I recall. This link should be good as a starting point: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gebrochene_Grotesk (Worst case, you can try throwing this link at a machine translator.)

Fournier's picture

William Morris' Troy fits the actual concept of Neo-Blackletter or Blackletter Sans.

Tom Carnase's ITC Honda (1970) has not only the Blackletter Sans leaning but combined with the weight of a slab serif/fat face if you catch my meaning.

I found another lead concerning the concept through Eric Gill's Jubilee.
What do you think of Gill's Jubilee and its cognitive bias?

Té Rowan's picture

Were there a humanist-sans blackletter style, Jubilee would probably be it.

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