Fat fad font, 60's?

gregbataille's picture

Planning a project around all the great vintage signage still in play in Worcester, MA. This one is downtown at the Worcester Common. Anyone recognize this? The W and the lowercase e are very distinctive.
Greg

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donshottype's picture

Pump by Letraset 1970. Excellent Bauhaus style. Digital http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/letraset/pump/ There is also pump Triline by Letraset 1976. Digital Pump Triline by Philip Kelly for Linotype http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/linotype/pump-lt/
Don

gregbataille's picture

Pump isn't exactly right, but I think it is stylistically close enough for my purposes. Thanks donshottype!

donshottype's picture

You're welcome Greg. Bear in mind that for several decades before digital fonts, signs were not made direct from fonts. They were either done by hand or by photographic means that allowed morphing of weight, relative width and relative height of letters.
Don

osamu's picture

To add to what Don said, pre-digital typefaces also often came with many alternate forms for specific characters - such as the slanted crossbar on the lowercase /e, or perhaps a rounded as well as an angled /w. This habit was particularly flavour-of-the-month during the '70s. Sadly, most early digitizations of these fonts did not carry over the alternates, presumably as postscript type 1 and ttf file formats of the time did not have the needed glyph positions or means of accessing them. So don't assume that a digital font is not the droid you're looking for simply because one or two glyph shapes differ slightly.

Now, with unicode, otf and the rich features within, this is beginning to change. I do hope that many of these funky fonts are revisited and that lost alternates start coming to light once again.

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