A piece from the first written instance of the name of Lithuania in the Annals of Quedlinburg (1009)

piesnia's picture

More information from wiki can be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annals_of_Quedlinburg

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piesnia's picture

Hey! Please help me to identify what is this font style.

donshottype's picture

For a proper answer you would do best to consult a Medievalist.
This type of script is sometimes called miniscule.
I found an interesting page with samples including some that have similarities. For example a 13th Century English Chancery Hand from Germany http://medievalwriting.50megs.com/scripts/examples/c13chancery.htm and other minisucles and cursives etc. http://medievalwriting.50megs.com/scripts/scrindex.htm
Don

Albert Jan Pool's picture

Sorry, but I do not think that the 13th Century English Chancery Hand from Germany is similar to the hand in the ‘Annals of Quedlinburg’ as shown here. Shure, both can be described as minuscule, but minuscule includes a fairly wide range of styles which is known as ‘lower case’ in typography. The example shown on mediavalwriting has a roman / an interrupted construction (two-story a and g, no upstroke in the n). The Annals of Quedlinburg are written with a cursive / running construction (one story a and g, upstroke in n). Also it has to be noted that on Wikipedia the following is stated: ‘The original document has disappeared, surviving only as a 16th-century copy held in Dresden’. This means that the text is based on / copied from annals probably written between 1008 and 1030, but this does not tell us anything on how the script in the original document may have looked like. When the description of the document as shown on Wikipedia is accurate enough, this could be the Dresden version from the 16th century. The script is a humanist cursive as we know it from the italian writing masters such as Arrighi and Palatino. Arrighi published his writing method in his book Il Operina around 1524. A facsimile which includes a translated version can be found at the website of Gunnlaugur SE Briem: http://66.147.242.192/~operinan/8/index.html

donshottype's picture

Hi Albert, thanks for the clarification. So Arrighi style humanist cursive is the closest match?
Don

donshottype's picture

Closest match I can find to the style of Arrighi humanist cursive are 1522 Vicentino by Gilles Le Corre [GLC]:


http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/glc/1522-vicentino/ and P22 Operina Corsivo by James Grieshaber http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/ihof/p22-operina/
Don

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