Archive through March 26, 2003

matteson's picture

OK, hopefully this isn't too vague, too easy, or too stupid.

In 2000, a translation of ancient poetry written by a Vietnamese concubine and translated by a poet from North Carolina State University was published. It's an interesting book not only because the poems are right good, but because it's published in 3 languages/scripts: English, modern Vietnamese, and the old calligraphic script that the poet actually used.

1) Name the poet
2) Name the script
3) Name the man who created the digital realization of the script

I'll be online for a few more hours, but then I won't be back 'til 6 or 7am TST (Typophile Standard Time).

Cheers.

antiuser's picture

1. Ho Xuan Hu'ong
2. Nom
3. Ngo Thanh Nhan

//Edit: The poet who translated the poems is John Balaban.

aschmidt's picture

original poet: Ho Xuan Hu'ong
translating poet: John Balaban
writing system: N

matteson's picture

Obviously that was too easy. Adriano is right. Except that I think there's a circumflex in Nôm. Interestingly, the lines in all but one of the poems in the book have the same number of characters per line. I believe it's something akin to the sonnet form in English.

Take it away.

matteson's picture

And now I see Andrea's correct also. Boy, that was way too easy :-P

antiuser's picture

Hm, yes... Andrea is right, there is a circumflex.
Since I'm not very good at formulating questions, Andrea can ask the next one.
Or does that go against the rules?

matteson's picture

I don't see why that would be a problem...

John?

John Hudson's picture

It's up to Nathan to declare the winner. Technically, Andrea is more correct, and Adriano has indicated that he would not object to her posing the next question, so I think Nathan would be justified in declaring Andrea the winner.

Let's say that if Andrea does not post a question within the next 12 hours, then Adriano will pose the next question.

matteson's picture

Alright. I like John's idea. Let's say Andrea won due to that picky little circumflex. And in lieu of a question in 12 hours, it's Adriano. Or, by Rule 15, you could nominate someone else.

cheshiredave's picture

The rules debate is disturbingly hilarious. I'm surprised the pop quiz question "What was the original version of 'Robert's Rules of Order' set in, and who was the book designer?" hasn't been posed yet.

John Hudson's picture

What was the original version of 'Robert's [sic] Rules of Order' set in, and who was the book designer?

:-) And for bonus points: during which war between Britain and the USA did Roberts serve prior to developing an interest in parliamentary procedure?

Hmm. Maybe I need to formulate a rule about having pop quizes in the middle of the pop quiz thread.

cheshiredave's picture

John, you've just discovered the quickest way to thoroughly arouse my ire: flippantly accuse me of an error using a device such as [sic], when I am, in fact, correct.

John Hudson's picture

My sincerest apologies, you are indeed correct. The site I was looking at identified the author as Roberts, not Robert.

aschmidt's picture

i'm glad i re-read the rules b/c i just about to break rule #9.

what is the name of the movie with the opening film titles projected onto the body of a dancing woman?

if that's too easy here's a BONUS question: (speaking of cheshIRE; ) who stole the tarts?

now you'll have to forgive me if i am sleeping

 
z
z

z

z

z

z

z

z
rcapeto's picture

James Bond, "Goldfinger".
Titles by Maurice Binder.
There are probably other movies with this device, but
I guess Goldfinger was the first one (1964).

Oh, and the Knave of Hearts stole the tarts.

matteson's picture

Incidentally, though I have no idea what face it was printed in, Robert's Rules of Order was first printed here in Chicago at Griggs. So I'd say the compositors at Griggs did most of the "design." And, in blatant violation of Rule 12 (which probably doesn't matter since I doubt (hope) that we're starting a quiz within a quiz:-), I'm guessing Robert served in the Civil War. Which wasn't between Britain and the US, but since I grew up in Tennessee and we call Northerners "Yanks," maybe it's almost the same...

aschmidt's picture

uh, i guess i skipped rule #12.. does that make my questions null and void? or can this mistake be rectified somehow? i musta skipped that rule too.

matteson's picture

I think you're sorted out Andrea. I was just admitting to my guessing on the pop quiz within the pop quiz.

John Hudson's picture

Andrea, your answer was fine.

Was Rodolfo correct with Goldfinger?

Nathan, I'm not sure whether Robert served in the US Civil War or not, but the conflict to which I was referring was the altogether less bloody Pig War, the only casualty of which was the pig.

aschmidt's picture

nice one rodolfo, i was thinking from russia with love but you win with goldfinger. i think however it was robert brownjohn and not maurice binder who did the titles for both those movies:
http://www.artofjamesbond.com/brownjohn.htm

: )

matteson's picture

Nice link John. Had no idea about such an "atrocity."

rcapeto's picture

i was thinking from russia with love but you win with
goldfinger.


Do I? I think not. I didn't remember that From Russia
with Love, an earlier film, used the same concept.
And actually, as I see in the nice link you've posted,
in Goldfinger - as opposed to FRWL - there were images
projected on the body, but the actual titles were not.
So I don't win, and the turn reverts to you, I think. ;)

BTW, sorry for the Binder/Brownjohn confusion.
Brownjohn was great.

aschmidt's picture

hm, but you were so close. plus you nailed the knave of hearts. plus i have a meeting now. can i revert the turn back to you: )

eomine's picture

so, whose turn is it anyway?

matteson's picture

Good question. I just glanced through the rules, but can't figure it out. Where's the Quizmaster?

rcapeto's picture

It seems that, since Andrea accepted my answer as correct,
and no one challenged me except myself, it is my turn anyway.
So. My online time will be short and fragmented so I'm posting
what I think (*) is an easy one.

(*) I don't find it very elegant when the quiz's poster says,
after someone answers it, "well that was too easy", as if
detracting from the winner's achievement. ;)

Question: What was the Greek epigraphic style with lines running
alternately from left to right and right to left called, and -
that's the important part - why was it called that way?

Good luck.

matteson's picture

Boustrophedon. "As the ox turns in the plowing."

>(*) I don't find it very elegant when the quiz's poster says,
after someone answers it, "well that was too easy", as if
detracting from the winner's achievement. ;)

My apologies. :-/

Miss Tiffany's picture

Oh man! I knew this one. You are too fast Nathan :-)

Stephen Coles's picture

Dread. Do not arouse the ire of the Cheshire!

Joe Pemberton's picture

That's CHESHIRE...

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