leni riefenstahl olympia book 1936 I would love to know what this is

andewtiller's picture

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Ryuk's picture

Looks hand-drawn to me as all repeating letters look different.

donshottype's picture

Perhaps the most distinctive feature of this lettering is the arrowhead/beaked serif terminals at the top and bottom of C and S.
Some fonts with this feature:
Horley Old Style by Frank Hinman Pierpont 1925 for Monotype:
http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/mti/horley-old-style/
Kennerley by Frederic W. Goudy for publisher Mitchell Kennerley in 1911:
LTC version:
http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/lanston/ltc-kennerley/
Berthold version:
http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/berthold/kennerley-bq/
Caslon 540:
Linotype version:
http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/linotype/caslon-540/
Bitstream version:
http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/bitstream/caslon-540/
ITC Caslon 224:
http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/itc/caslon-no-224/
Big Caslon by Mathew Carter:
http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/fontbureau/big-caslon/
The placement of the umlaut over the O was a not unusual feature of German lettering and fonts of the era.
Don

Ryuk's picture

Far from perfect but I like Goldenbook by Mark Simonson, mainly because of the /R.

donshottype's picture

I forgot to mention that the R is found in Goudy's Kennerley. See previous post for LT & BT versions. Another version is Red Rooster's TCKingsley http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/redrooster/tc-kingsley-rr/
Don

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