Traditional Polish Blackletter/Fraktur

umlautthoni's picture

Good friends of ours will be celebrating their first born's 1yr bday. I wanted to do something special and thought I would do a wood carving of the Polish crest with their last name in Blackletter/Fraktur style lettering. However, I wanted to use a traditional Polish style lettering. Would anyone know if there is a font that fits this description?

Thank you very much.

froo's picture

Dear Mark,
I do not think that Blackletter or Fraktur were the right choice. The medieval scripts do not actually exist in the Polish visual tradition since the 17th century, being broadly associated with German culture. For Poles, Blackletter smells rather more like funeral than birthday. I would suggest handcut Aldines.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/24/Wizerunek_zywota_czlo...

froo's picture

Doubled post.

JamesM's picture

> being broadly associated with German culture

I don't know anything about Polish fonts, but one side of my family is of Polish descent and anything associated with Germany might not be well received by older Polish family members. Germany invaded Poland in WWII and relations between the countries have often been strained since then.

JamesM's picture

> being broadly associated with German culture

I don't know anything about Polish fonts, but one side of my family is of Polish descent and anything associated with Germany might not be well received by older Polish family members. Germany invaded Poland in WWII and relations between the countries have often been strained since then.

umlautthoni's picture

froo: Thank you very much for the information. Would you happen to know if there is a digitized version of that typeface and if so, where I could purchase it? If it isn't available, would it it still invoke thoughts of funerals if it were only the last name in Blackletter at the bottom of the family crest?

JamesM: I am very aware of the rancor between these two very proud peoples. The father is of German descent with Welsh and possibly English and the mother is 100% Polish American. The Blackletter was my attempt at paying homage to the father's side of the family.

I want to thank both of you very much for your insights. It is all very helpful.

Mark

froo's picture

Use San Marco, which has nice small caps; or Clairvaux. But... Duc de Berry is really fancy! I'd probably chose this one. They all look festive, yet have somehow modern form. All at myfonts.com.

froo's picture

Use San Marco, which has nice small caps; or Clairvaux. But... Duc de Berry is really fancy! I'd probably chose this one. They all look festive, yet have somehow modern form. All at myfonts.com.

froo's picture

Use San Marco, which has nice small caps; or Clairvaux. But... Duc de Berry is really fancy! I'd probably chose this one. They all look festive, yet have somehow modern form. All at myfonts.com.

bartd's picture

I would not know about present day sentiments in Poland regarding blackletter, but it seems it used to be a quite common letter back in the day.
Why not use a festive Schwabacher (call it Szwabacha and it sounds genuinely Polish) like Verzierte Schwabacher?


You'll find a decent version by James Arboghast on Myfonts under the name of Sibyl. Quite remote from anything funerary, if you ask me.
-bartd

Syndicate content Syndicate content