TT to MAC PS (Or OpenType) Conversion...

Hildebrant's picture

I have a font (freeware) that I need converted to a MAC format (yes the EULA permits this). Would somone be able to assist me? Im not concerned about all the aspects that would be lost in this process, I basically just need a few glyphs from it. (But I do need it in font format).

If somone would be able to help me with this, that would be great!

Thanks,

Hildebrant.

oldnick's picture

If it's a PC Truetype font, and you're using OS X, you don't need to convert the font.

Hildebrant's picture

Really? If thats the case, that will be very helpful. Does it matter which version of OSX?

oldnick's picture

I don't think so. OS X's system .dfonts have been PC Trutype fonts in disguise from the beginning.

Hildebrant's picture

So is there anything special I have to do to make them work in OSX?

Hildebrant.

twardoch's picture

It is true that Mac OS X supports Windows TrueType fonts (.ttf).

Resource-fork Mac TrueType fonts from Mac OS 7 and later, and Windows TrueType fonts, had always been related. The same structure that is in the .ttf font was placed in the "sfnt" resource of the Mac TrueType font, along with some other pieces of data.

Mac OS X introduced data-fork Mac TrueType fonts (.dfont) which was a repackaged form of resource-fork Mac TrueType fonts known from Mac OS 7 and later. Indeed, both sorts of Mac TrueType fonts include the same pieces of data that are included in Windows TrueType fonts (.ttf).

However, Mac OS X data-fork Mac TrueType fonts (.dfont) are closer related to Mac OS Classic resource-fork Mac TrueType fonts than to Windows TrueType fonts (.ttf).

Regards,
Adam

Thomas Phinney's picture

No, nothing special.

But OS X's system .dfonts are not really PC TrueType fonts in disguise. They are Mac TrueType fonts in disguise. All that resource fork gunk has been stuffed into the data fork.

T

twardoch's picture

"So is there anything special I have to do to make them work in OSX?"

Non-Unicode Mac OS X applications use the cmap(1,0) encoding stored in the font. It can be controlled in FontLab Preferences / TrueType / Use following codepage to build cmap(1,0) table. By default, it's set to Mac OS Roman which is fine for most fonts so you don't need to change anything. Also, make sure that your font's metrics and naming are compatible with the recommendations:

http://groups.msn.com/fontlab/tipsandtricks.msnw?action=get_message&mview=0&ID_Message=4356
http://groups.msn.com/fontlab/tipsandtricks.msnw?action=get_message&mview=0&ID_Message=2843
http://groups.msn.com/fontlab/tipsandtricks.msnw?action=get_message&mview=0&ID_Message=3065

Regards,
Adam

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