Logo for singing teacher

mrmagenta's picture

Hello!

This is my first post here. I've been reading the critiques on this forum, and you guys are really good at this, so I thought I'd post this
piece to see if you can help me with some feedback.

This is a logo for a singer, the name is in swedish - vocal studio. Her wishes were; simple, formal, readable, fairly minimalistic without frills. I took inspiration from geometric sans fonts like avenir, century gothic and futura, and fitted a coloured whole note into it.

Any thoughts on the letters, color and overall impression?

Catharsis's picture

The letters look wobbly and inconsistent. You might want to use an actual font (and only one!).

mrmagenta's picture

I'm interested in what makes it look inconsistent though, if you can pin it down that would be helpful.
I mentioned the other fonts because I tried to learn from them how to tackle specific problems, for instance using the 'a' glyph in an otherwise geometric font, which characters use thinning towards the stem etc. I did try the logo in different existing fonts, but we didn't find what we were after all in one place.

I could use some help if you could say something specific about the letters. I think there's an inconsistency between the fairly bulky a and the thin s, but how to handle it without making a very wide 's' glyph... I'll try some variants.

Birdseeding's picture

Hej Zoran,

I'm not vaguely a professional, but I think I can give you a start? (Although this would all be much easier if you just went in and modded Century Gothic or something. ;))

One key thing is to try to look at things based on how they appear optically, rather than going by metrics. You've definitely been trying to do this, but the thickness of the various letters are all over the place. The arms of the k look thicker than the stem, the D looks thicker on the curved part... S as you say looks consistently thinner than the other characters, with it's lower terminal thick-looking. k's upper arm loooks longer than the lower arm, t crossbar too thin, o needs to have overhang to work. u is too wide. And I think you need to work over a lot of curves there that seem "wobbly", connect slightly off, vary unintentionally in curvature with respect of the other side etc...

Read something like this: http://66.147.242.192/~operinan/2/2.3.2a/2.3.2.06.illusion.htm

Lycka till!

mrmagenta's picture

That gives me many things to move forward on. Also, the link is very useful.
I have been doing graphics for some time, but in other domains. I find it more difficult to keep a fresh eye when working with types and letters than imagery, for me it's a lot more vague feelings and less ability to pin things down. Off to do some reading then.

Tack Birdseeder!

Catharsis's picture

I would just go with Avenir or maybe Gotham. If there's just one letter you don't like, such as the one-storey {a} in Futura, many professional fonts will have a stylistic alternate (a two-storey {a}) available.

You seem to be looking for a compact wordmark with short ascenders. That should be possible with any of the above-mentioned fonts, which have straight ascenders... just crop them a bit short if they're too long for you.

As for the wobbliness in your hand-made mark, I agree with what Birdseeding said. Also, the stress in the {v} is the wrong way round; the downstroke should be thicker than the upstroke.

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