Illustrating OpenType Substitutions for Users

chalon's picture

Greetings. Those of you who produce OpenType fonts: how do you inform users about the available glyph substitutions?

Is there a utility that will list and illustrate the substitutions that occur when the user chooses "contextual alternates," "stylistic alternates," etc.?

-- Eric

Thomas Phinney's picture

A user can use the glyph palette in Illustrator (CS and later) and InDesign to see which glyphs are accessed from each specific feature.

I don't know of any other currently-available end-user-friendly utility for doing this, although I'm sure it would be welcomed by end users.

However, I also suggest checking back in a couple of weeks.

T

magister's picture

I list and briefly explain the OT features in the manual that comes with my font for classicists, Biblical scholars, and medievalists.

I also have prepared two documents, one in Indesign and one in Mellel, that can be downloaded from my web site. The test files contain samples of regular text to which users can apply the relevant features and see the results, and there are specific instructions for how to apply each feature.

David Perry

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