Why is Linotype claiming it owns Eurostile by Novarese?

typeblog's picture

Why is Linotype claiming ownership of Eurostile and filing trademark applications when it is in the public domain?

Following are Adobe's notes on Eurostile

Typeface notes:
In 1952, Aldo Novarese and A. Butti designed Microgramma for the Nebiolo foundry. It was a popular face, but was available only in capitals. In 1962, Novarese produced a full character set, including lowercase letters, and the foundry renamed the family Eurostile. The letters are square-shaped with rounded corners, producing a look reminiscent of the machinery, technology, and interior design of the 1950s.
Designers:
A. Butti
Aldo Novarese
Eurostile is a trademark of Nebiolo.

billtroop's picture

Who knows? Maybe Adobe's information is wrong? Such things have happened before. Maybe Lino acquired the trademark? And who is typeblog and why does he care?

typeblog's picture

Linotype has not acquired the trademark.

Possibly Linotype is registering public domain typeface names to monopolize the market.

This is not good for type designers who want to create new interpretations.

Si_Daniels's picture

If the trademark has been abandoned I don't think anyone can blame Linotype for attempting to register it. This could be seen as a self-preservation tactic. If the TM fell into the wrong hands the new owner could come after Linotype.

Si

typeblog's picture

But Si there are several foundries that offer Eurostile so Linotype could prevent them from using it.

And if a trademark has been abandoned then it is in the public domain and that does not give Linotype the right to claim it exclusively.

John Hudson's picture

If a trademark has been abandoned, it does not automatically enter the public domain. A trademark can be judged to have entered the public domain if it has become a generic term and has not been legally defended by a company claiming the trademark. But if a company ceases to exist or simply neglects its trademarks, it is possible for another company to try to register that trademark. The application can be challenged by other companies, or by individuals if they believe that the name has become a generic term.


Habemus papam!

Nick Shinn's picture

>This is not good for type designers who want to create new interpretations.

If it's an interpretation, it warrants a different name.
Such as Foundry Monoline.

The only people Linotype's action could hurt are those trying to cash in on the original name and design, which isn't really type design, is it? Although it is font business.

If you want to play that game, then why not register the name yourself, or challenge Linotype's claim?

typeblog's picture

It appears that Linotype is the one playing the game.

as8's picture

We got Linopope Library GmbH,
the new Vatican German foundry !

AS

billtroop's picture

>This is not good for type designers who want to create new interpretations.

Like type designers are interested in redigitizing Eurostile? Come come, is that the great concern that is being discussed today in ... Heidelberg?

>Anonymous posting, how convenient.

Not when everybody knows who it is.

johnbutler's picture

Is this what you're driving at?

typeblog's picture

That's interesting.

And by the way Linotype is also trying to register Clarendon and New Century Schoolbook. What's next Gothic?

.00's picture

The r is too wide

Si_Daniels's picture

> What's next Gothic?

I like this one from the Apple TM list...

'Capitals'

Si

jay's picture

does that mean that are we going to have to pay apple a commission every time we use a capital letter? :0)

Bald Condensed's picture

quote:

Habemus papam!



Just what the world needs -- an ultra-conservative pope. How many
more catholics have to be infected and die of AIDS? Ratzinger is
major bad news for women, homosexuals, the African continent ...

Re: typeblog's remarks -- Anonymous posting, how convenient.

Bald Condensed's picture

quote:

Not when everybody knows who it is.



Hehe, must've missed an episode somewhere along the line.

Bald Condensed's picture

"This" is actually looking pretty good. :-) I know for sure a bunch
of art directors, publication designers and architects are going to
cream their pants when they see "this".

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