Nike - Clot Rat Pack - FONT ID

Danny_Miller's picture

Looking for an ID on the font used to spell out 'Clot Rat Pack' for this Nike varsity jacket.

Many thanks in advance,
Danny

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donshottype's picture

The bumps on the letters are called center spurs.
This type of font could be called Spurred Roman. Very popular in the mid 19th century and often classified as Western or Wild West.
I did not find an exact match.
I found one in a heavier weight, called Cowboy Western, from Font Mesa:
http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/fontmesa/cowboy-western/
There are also some fonts in the Western category at dafont.com:
Saddlebag by Dieter Steffmann, K22 Ambelyn by Toto, & Let Me Ride by Måns Grebäck.
Don

Ryuk's picture

Don't have a match (yet!). The closest I have is H74 Warriors. I'm pretty convinced it is a font and not a hand-lanterring. You can see here some photos of the making process, one showing the typeset under Illustrator. You could also have a look to the video and around 1'09, there's a black flag with the type. That could be useful to printscreen and upload it here to make identification process easier.

EDIT: finally got the sample by myself, can be shown here. Fivos with his tremendous software may help.

donshottype's picture

H74 Warriors is a nice font for showing placement of spurs. But the base letterform shown in the sample image is a Roman with a unified base and top for the stems, rather than the split or bifurcated stems used in H74 Warriors. This type of letterform is in the group labelled Tuscan. There was a good discussion of the Tuscan Letterform four years ago at http://typophile.com/node/41566 And for people who read books there is a substantial chapter on the Tuscan letterform in Nicollete Grey's Nineteenth Century Ornamented Type.
Don

Ryuk's picture

The only "problem" I can see is there's a big chance it is actually an exclusive proprietary font by Nike as many of their letterings.

donshottype's picture

To duplicate the sample you need a font that looks somewhat like these letters that I whipped together in Fontshop.


I am surprised that nothing other than a Tuscan has turned up among the thousands of fonts now available.
Don

donshottype's picture

The Nike sample is useful. It reveals the spur placement for more letters. Fortunately no surprises here. After all the design is about 170 years old. Spur placement and inclusion or not on various strokes varied from font to font.
I note that the weight shown in this image is a little heavier than the original image, perhaps due to blurring.
Presumably the actual Nike font is a match.
By the way, the letters shown in my previous post would need to be heavier to match the original image and the serifs adjusted to match.
Don

franclee's picture

stahls tiffany looks quite close

donshottype's picture

If you are happy with Stahl's Tiffany -- a Tuscan with split stems rather than the flat ends used on the Nike jacket -- this simplifies your font search. However, if some of the comments I encountered in a web search are accurate, Stahl's Tiffany is popular with makers of T-shirts and other casual items but they find it difficult to purchase separately.
This is not a major problem as the general design of spurred Tuscan fonts has been generic since the mid 19th century. It should not be too difficult to find a spurred Tuscan with low contrast and weight similar to the Nike font and Stahl's Tiffany for purchase, or even a free version with sufficient quality. A search of Myfonts using "Wild West" produced several spurred Tuscans that you might review: Hessian, Miss. Scarlett, URW Wood Type, Saloon Girl, Buckhorn, H74 Warriors [mentioned already by Ryuk], and Saloon. Dafont has similar free versions.
Don

Ryuk's picture

Adding a reworked sample.

donshottype's picture

Reworked sample looks good!
Easy for someone to font. As for additional letters of the uppercase alphabet we already have info on C, L, P & K. The remainder are generally obvious -- S & Z on the diagonal; J probably wide & not below baseline; M & W a couple of versions. Only the tail on Q is a complete unknown.
As far as I understand copyright law [American & related] there is no restriction on creating a font, or an eps file, based on an image. But use of the digital outlines in a font is a violation. [See the Stone case and the "distinctive" r.]
Don

Ryuk's picture

Complete alphabet can be seen here: http://www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/forum/case/427788/

donshottype's picture

Excellent Ryuk! The complete alphabet posted by "nancy..." at Myfonts almost two years ago answers the essential questions as to the design of the font.
Her reference to "Bowery font" is interesting. Perhaps the source is lettering from old New York? For persons unfamiliar with New York, it had a district informally known as "The Bowery."
Don't know if her email is still current. BTW, I am not a registered participant in Myfonts "WhatTheFont" form.
Don

Ryuk's picture

I guess this type is referenced as "Bowery" simply because she has seen it at Nike Bowery Stadium, 276 Bowery in Manhattan as all the samples previously posted here (flag, varsity Destroyer jacket...).

donshottype's picture

Thanks. Useful info. Not need to pester "nancy...."
Don

Danny_Miller's picture

wow so many helpful posts. thank you all!!

donshottype's picture

Perhaps the base font for Bowery Rat Pack is Goudy's Copperplate Gothic Condensed Bold:
http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/urw/copperplate/


For a more emphatic treatment of the serifs see M. D. Adkins and James L Stirling's Copper Penny from The Fontry, "a tribute" to Goudy's font:
http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/fontry/copper-penny/
Do some letterform adjustments to match the samples, add spurs, & voila you have Bowery Rat Pack.
Don

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