De Vinne's Cushing isn't modern Cushing - what is it?

fleisch's picture

While browsing old type catalogs on Google Books, I ran across a friendly, light Arts & Crafts face in the De Vinne catalog (ca. 1900, I looked at several iterations), although it appears to have originated with ATF. This face went by the name of Cushing, but as you can see, it bears little to no resemblance to the semi-condensed typeface that uses that name in the catalogs of Adobe, Berthold, EF, ITC, etc.

The latter-day Cushing is clearly a descendant of Cushing Old Style, as shown in the 1894 Norwood Press catalog (won't bother you with that one).

A more detailed showing of the Cushing I'm after is available on pp. 2-8 of the 1897 De Vinne catalog, "Old Faces of Roman and Medieval Types Lately Added to the De Vinne Press":
http://books.google.com/books/reader?id=awFC5idamkQC&printsec=frontcover&output=reader&pg=GBS.PA7
(Not sure if that link will work, but you can look it up)

My question is whether this font and its italic companion have been digitized, and if so, what is the modern face called?

fleisch's picture

Update: I see from an 1898 ATF catalog that the version I'm interested in is called Cushing Monotone (as opposed to Cushing Old Style, which, ironically, is the modern version). Still interested in whether there is a modern digitized version masquerading under some other name.

Syndicate content Syndicate content