Type ID Board: Frequently Asked Questions

How do I post a type identification request?
What do I enter in the "Title" line?
How do I create these nifty blue hyperlinks?
Can I help with the identification of my sample?
Do I need to register to post a type ID request?
Is this a free service?

I've posted an ID request seconds ago and my sample has already been identified. How is that possible?
I've posted an ID request days ago and still haven't received any reply. How is that possible?
The subject line of my thread has been changed.
My sample has been identified. How do I change the subject line to indicate that?
Why is there sometimes more than one person credited for the identification?
Can I have a go at it myself?
Where can I do my own research?
What about scripts that resemble casual handwriting?
And logos of sports teams?

How do I post a type identification request?
At the top of the thread list you'll see a link which says Post a new topic. Click it.

What do I enter in the "Title" line?
Try to define your type ID request as clearly as possible. For example "1960's newspaper headline face" or "Lost in Translation movie logo" or "retro script" will do nicely. Whereas "Please help me identify this font" is pretty pointless as that's the only thing we do on the Type Identification Board. Compare it to a newspaper where every single headline would say "Stuff happened!"

How do I create these nifty blue hyperlinks?
If you type in a regular URL like http://typophile.com/forum/29 it will activate the URL automatically, but it's tidier to "cleanlink" using common HTML formatting. See the "Formatting guidelines:" below the "Body:" box.

Can I help with the identification of my sample?
As a matter of fact yes. Tell us whatever you know about your sample that might be useful. Information such as the country and age of the sample, and whether it is from a web site, or from a scan of printed material. (For example, if we know something comes from an advertisement published in the 50's it rules out a lot of possibilities.)

Do I need to register to post a type ID request?
Although this is a public posting area, you need to register. But what the heck, it's free!

Is this a free service?
Yep, lucky you. Most of the areas on Typophile are free, but if you wish to support Typophile, gain access to the members-only areas and receive lots of cool perks, you can become a member.

I've posted an ID request seconds ago and my sample has already been identified. How is that possible?
Most of our type IDers are subscribed to the Type ID RSS Feed, which means we are notified almost instantly when a new request is posted. As we do this for fun and there's a healthy level of competition of this board, we're going to try to ID your sample as fast as possible. Furthermore we have IDers all over the world, so there's bound to be at least one of us online whenever you might post your request, day or night, even during the weekend.

I've posted an ID request days ago and still haven't received any reply. How is that possible?
Though it's quite rare, that can happen too. Rest assured we will have had a look at your sample as the number of reads displayed at the bottom of your post will testify. Sometimes we simply don't have a clue. The best way to "revive" your thread is to post a little reminder in your original thread. Please don't create a duplicate thread with the same request as this annoys the hell out of me.

The subject line of my thread has been changed.
There's two possible reasons for that.
One | The name you gave to your thread was very vague so we changed it into something better defined. This makes it easier for our type IDers to keep track of the different threads.
Two | Your sample has been identified. Your thread gets tagged and we include the name of the typeface(s) you were looking for and the name(s) of the person(s) who IDed it/them for you. That way we don't need to needlessly open threads to check if there's still need for our services.

My sample has been identified. How do I change the subject line to indicate that?
There's no need. We'll do it for you.

Why is there sometimes more than one person credited for the identification?
We call that cross-posting: when two or more people identify a sample simultaneously they won't know somebody else is posting the solution untill their own message appears in the thread. As they clearly didn't know of each other, they both get credited.

Can I have a go at it myself?
Definitely: the more the merrier! The reason this board works so efficiently is because we have gathered a group of people from very different backgrounds with each their area of expertise. So join in with the fun: each new type IDer adds his/her little extra to the mix.

Where can I do my own research?
First of all our very own Search function (momentarily disabled) allows you to search through previous threads in order to check if your sample has been IDed before. For example if you're looking for the Gucci logo or the typeface used for the Björk "Volumen" DVD release, do a search by keyword for "Gucci" or "Bjork", make sure you look in text of messages and limit your search to the Type Identification Board. (BTW they're both custom drawn so that's tough noogies.)

Then there's Identifont, the unique font identifier that enables you to identify a font from a sample by answering a series of simple questions. It is ideal if you want to match an existing typeface, or identify a typeface you have seen in a publication.
Identifont includes information about fonts from most of the major type libraries, including Adobe, Agfa-Monotype, Berthold, Bitstream, Elsner+Flake, Font Bureau, FontFont, ITC, Letraset, Linotype, P22, and URW++.

Another place to go is MyFonts' WhatTheFont?!: upload a scanned image of the font you're looking for and the WhatTheFont font recognition system will search their database and show you the closest matches.
Furthermore MyFonts' keyword search is very efficient if you know how to describe the typeface you're looking for. Is your sample a decorative flowy script? How about Candice? Does it look like a typeface straight out of a western? Simply type wild-west.

If you're looking for scripts in particular, try Mike Yanega's impressive Script Font Identification Guide, with its accompanying Script Font Reference List, covering over 3,000 Script and Hand-drawn fonts. It's a very valuable visual reference tool, which allows you to find about any script known to man in a number of handy categories.

Finally, if you don't have a sample but you know the general anatomical characteristics of the font you're seeking, try FontShop's TypeNavigator. You can narrow down FontShop's large collection to the fonts that meet your criteria by selecting buttons representing style, weight, width, contrast, contour, and so on.

What about scripts that resemble casual handwriting?
Ooh, that's a tough one. You see, these are very easy and quite cheap to make, so there are a gazillion different handwritten fonts out there. So unless it's one of the better known handwritten fonts, the chances that we identify yours are quite slim. On the other hand, if you look around you'll most probably find an alternative that matches really closely.

And logos of sports teams?
There you have to keep in mind that sports merchandising -- everything from baseball caps to soccer jerseys -- is big business, so the popular sports teams have every reason to make their logo as difficult to imitate as possible. Most of them are custom designed or use heavily customized existing fonts.

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