>>> Type ID Pop Quiz V2.5 - Expert Level

Florian Hardwig's picture

This is how it works:

  • A portion of a glyph is published in the Type ID Pop Quiz.
  • Try to identify the glyph and the typeface. To win, you need to name at least:
    1. typeface
    2. weight
    3. character/glyph
  • Show off your knowledge by casually mentioning additional trivia, like who designed it, when and by whom was it (first) published, and other cool stuff to impress your fellow Typophiles with.
  • The winner produces a new challenge – a portion of a glyph, black on white background, presented in a 288 × 288 pixel square, including a R204G000B00 1 pixel border.
  • The person who posts a challenge can’t win the next game.

In case of any disputes, Mr Bald Condensed or me will act as judge, jury and avenging angel of wrath.

If you think this is a little too difficult, maybe try the Entry Level Type ID Pop Quiz or Intermediary Level Type ID Pop Quiz first.

Good luck everyone, and have fun. ;^)

With respectful thanks to the originator of this utterly useless but highly entertaining waste of time, the often imitated but never duplicated Cheshire Dave.

Sindre's picture

No-one? Really? OK, I'll make it easy. This typeface is named after (but not necessarily designed by) a prolific British type designer.

eliason's picture

Ah, Gill Facia it must be.

What do you know about this font? I've never come across it before?

Sindre's picture

Gill Facia it is.

I don't know much about it, really. I once worked for an organisation that insisted on using Gill Sans for its written stuff, so I licensed Gill Facia as a companion face for headlines and stuff. I actually quite like it, with all its alternates and ligatures, though it's generally scorned upon by designers, I think. It's designed by Colin Banks, who also gave the British Post Office its look.

Your turn!

eliason's picture

Here we go:

Birdseeding's picture

Is that some sort of swash?

eliason's picture

No, not a swash.

eliason's picture

No, and no.
Another view, same glyph and scale:

riccard0's picture

@?

eliason's picture

Yes, it's an at-sign.

eliason's picture

The designer is a creative character from South America.

riccard0's picture

Titulata Fat, by Eduardo Rodríguez Tunni of Tipo.

eliason's picture

That's it, Riccard0! It's the clever reversed-out at-sign from Titulata.


You're up.

riccard0's picture

Thank you, Craig.
Now I need to sort out some computer problem and will post my cropped image as soon as possible! :-)

riccard0's picture


Here we are.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Is it an l (el)?

riccard0's picture

Close… but no ;-)

Birdseeding's picture

Is it an /L/ then?

riccard0's picture

Not close in that sense ;-)

Frode Bo Helland's picture

It's an e?

riccard0's picture

Not a vowel either.

riccard0's picture

That’s it! :-)

riccard0's picture

One could say that this font is strong

Florian Hardwig's picture

Ah, that was too much of a hint!
It is Carl Reissberger’s Forte, right? One of the few typefaces designed by an Austrian. And one of the nicer fonts that come with Microsoft Office – at least I feel it has suffered less from having been bundled than others.

riccard0's picture

Yes, it is: the uncompromising, double-looped, single-stroke, baseline-breaking lowercase k from Forte (which, in Italian, means "strong" or "loud"):


Your turn :-)

Florian Hardwig's picture

Thanks!
Here is the new challenge. No hints for the moment. Happy guessing!

Florian Hardwig's picture

This character is not a letter, but it is part of ASCII.

eliason's picture

% maybe?

Florian Hardwig's picture

That is correct. The designer of this typeface taught in New York and Boston.

komiska's picture

Matthew Carter?

Florian Hardwig's picture

No. The designer died while imprisoned in Nazi Germany.

Tim Ahrens's picture

Is it a Czech designer?

Florian Hardwig's picture

Yes. The typeface has been digitized twice. One of the digital versions comes in three variations, optimized for different sizes.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Exactly! It is the percent sign from Preissig Antikva, designed by Vojtěch Preissig (1873–1944) in the 1920s, digitized by František Štorm with the help of Otakar Karlas in 1998.


Your turn, Tim.

Tim Ahrens's picture

Ah, this font is perfect for cropping a character. Spoilt for choice!

Jiří Toman's picture

Someone has to start...is that letter ‘G’?

Tim Ahrens's picture

No, not a G. Not a g either.

eliason's picture

Some kind of pseudo-Hebrew font? Or Art Nouveau?

Tim Ahrens's picture

No, not a pseudo-Hebrew. Not Art Nouveau either. Definitely retro but a few decades later.

Jiří Toman's picture

So it could be one of those ‘psychadelic’ fonts from sixties/seventies, right?

Jiří Toman's picture

Well...isn’t that letter ‘J’ from Blackcurrant Squash designed by Rian Hughes?

Tim Ahrens's picture

Solved!

It is indeed Rian Hughes' Blackcurrant. I think I took the J from Blackcurrant Black, not Squash, but looking at it, there is hardly any difference so let's not nitpick.

Jiří, over to you.

Jiří Toman's picture

Ok Tim, thanks for your generosity!

So let’s try this one…

riccard0's picture

&?

Jiří Toman's picture

So there is a little hint – if I had to give this typeface a nickname, I’d use ‘The Überjannon’.

Jiří Toman's picture

Should I give you another hint?

riccard0's picture

I suppose it’s italic, but it’s the regular one or an alternate?

Syndicate content Syndicate content