>>> Type ID Pop Quiz V2.5 - Expert Level

Florian Hardwig's picture

This is how it works:

  • A portion of a glyph is published in the Type ID Pop Quiz.
  • Try to identify the glyph and the typeface. To win, you need to name at least:
    1. typeface
    2. weight
    3. character/glyph
  • Show off your knowledge by casually mentioning additional trivia, like who designed it, when and by whom was it (first) published, and other cool stuff to impress your fellow Typophiles with.
  • The winner produces a new challenge – a portion of a glyph, black on white background, presented in a 288 × 288 pixel square, including a R204G000B00 1 pixel border.
  • The person who posts a challenge can’t win the next game.

In case of any disputes, Mr Bald Condensed or me will act as judge, jury and avenging angel of wrath.

If you think this is a little too difficult, maybe try the Entry Level Type ID Pop Quiz or Intermediary Level Type ID Pop Quiz first.

Good luck everyone, and have fun. ;^)

With respectful thanks to the originator of this utterly useless but highly entertaining waste of time, the often imitated but never duplicated Cheshire Dave.

Birdseeding's picture

Well, now it's gone easy suddenly - it is indeed another k.

Birdseeding's picture

It's not a script font.

Birdseeding's picture

It's a typeface directed towards a very specialised user. In fact, it's a futher narrowing of the intended user base from the another version of this typeface, which already has a narrow intended group of users.

John Lyttle's picture

Is it the "k" in Jeremy Tankard's Aspect (heavy weight, I think)?

Birdseeding's picture

No, I'm afraid not. It's a sans-serif... more or less, though a bit cursive.

PabloImpallari's picture

Looks like Ronnia, but it's not.

Nick Job's picture

Sassoon Infant Bold /k/?

Birdseeding's picture

Nick's got it. Well done! Sassoon is a typeface designed by Dr. Rosemary Sassoon, a handwriting researcher and typographer, especially for children to read. Each letterform has been thoroughly researched with tests of actual children reading. It comes in four versions, of which the most recent, "infant", is for younger children and includes more handwriting-like glyphs.

Nick Job's picture

Here goes...

Jan's picture

Q?

Nick Job's picture

Yes, Q.

Nick Job's picture

Need a clou?

Jan's picture

Yes.

Nick Job's picture

Since you know its a Q...

Nick Job's picture

When you stick the name of this font into Wikipedia, you get an Austrian guy who played field handball last century, no mention of the font though!

riccard0's picture

Houschka, by fellow typophile Nick Cooke.
It's funny how, distracted by the curvy A, I never noticed this beautifully sharp Q!

http://www.identifont.com/show?4Y1

Nick Job's picture

Well done, Riccardo. It is indeed a very beautiful Q from Houschka Pro Medium (Nick Cooke's G-Type).

You're up next!

Nick Cooke's picture

That took a while! Well done Riccardo.

riccard0's picture

Thanks all :-)
Here we go:

Birdseeding's picture

Is it a /¿/?

riccard0's picture

¡No! ;-)

Ria Anderson's picture

Is this the Q from Ambicase Modern Poster?

riccard0's picture

Kudos for such a quick answer! Indeed it is.
(if anyone missed it, here’s the thread where fellow typophile Craig Eliason shared its development: http://www.typophile.com/node/60316)

Ria Anderson's picture

Thank you!

Here's a new one:

eliason's picture

Now I've really arrived! :-)

Birdseeding's picture

Okay, before I go clinically insane, is it a /d/? ;)

Ria Anderson's picture

Yes, it's a /d/.

Ria Anderson's picture

The designer of this typeface is American.

Ria Anderson's picture

Hint: This typeface began its life as a Jenson revival.

Birdseeding's picture

I have to confess I'm just about ready to give this one up. :D More hints?

Ria Anderson's picture

Hmm... Here's a few hints:

The designer developed this typeface here on Typophile, where he originally labelled it with a saintly name.

It's frequently brought up in discussions of typefaces with relatively-upright italics.

The typeface contains a (beautiful) inline variant.

PabloImpallari's picture

Eason italic? By Randall Jones
Love the Inline version, BTW

Ria Anderson's picture

Yes, you got it! I agree, the inline is gorgeous.

Your turn!

PabloImpallari's picture

Oka.. Here we go again!

eliason's picture

Is that a /7/?

PabloImpallari's picture

Yep it is.
A beautiful one.

PabloImpallari's picture

Tip: It´s a Italic 7

Sindre's picture

Another hint, please?

PabloImpallari's picture

Tip: It´s not the schoolbook version.

riccard0's picture

It could be a Century* (751?) Bold or Black Italic.

* there are so many (cfr. http://typophile.com/node/80989)

Sindre's picture

I've checked that, but no exact match.

PabloImpallari's picture

Riccardo is right.
Century 715 Bitstream Black Italic

riccard0's picture

I think Sindre got it right before me! :-)

Sindre's picture

I removed my answer, because I couldn't make Century 751 Black (nor any of the other black and bold Centuries I tried) exactly match the sample. So nominally, you won.

riccard0's picture

But, morally, the victory is yours.
And, I'm sure you will come up with something better than anything I could.

Sindre's picture

OK, then.

This shouldn't be too hard, I think.

Sindre's picture

t.

Sindre's picture

This typeface might not quite deserve its name.

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