>>> Type ID Pop Quiz V2.5 - Expert Level

Florian Hardwig's picture

This is how it works:

  • A portion of a glyph is published in the Type ID Pop Quiz.
  • Try to identify the glyph and the typeface. To win, you need to name at least:
    1. typeface
    2. weight
    3. character/glyph
  • Show off your knowledge by casually mentioning additional trivia, like who designed it, when and by whom was it (first) published, and other cool stuff to impress your fellow Typophiles with.
  • The winner produces a new challenge – a portion of a glyph, black on white background, presented in a 288 × 288 pixel square, including a R204G000B00 1 pixel border.
  • The person who posts a challenge can’t win the next game.

In case of any disputes, Mr Bald Condensed or me will act as judge, jury and avenging angel of wrath.

If you think this is a little too difficult, maybe try the Entry Level Type ID Pop Quiz or Intermediary Level Type ID Pop Quiz first.

Good luck everyone, and have fun. ;^)

With respectful thanks to the originator of this utterly useless but highly entertaining waste of time, the often imitated but never duplicated Cheshire Dave.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Mitchell, you are very close: this is not Bernhard Tango, but a font based on it.

Mitchell Au's picture

Carmine Tango? Wait, that's not it...

Mitchell Au's picture

So is this the one from c1910 or the 90s?

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Sorry; original (Bernhard Tango) is from 1931-34, and this version is from 1995.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

And this could in fact be more difficult than I thought; I Googled the font and the maker, and found no mention of this font. This was in a font package I bought in 1999.

Mitchell Au's picture

Was the package released in 1995 or 1999?

Tomi from Suomi's picture

1995 or 1996, I believe.

PabloImpallari's picture

Not Ballroom Tango also..

Tomi from Suomi's picture

No. A big hint: made by Richard Beatty.

Mitchell Au's picture

Was the package called Richard Beatty Designs?

Tomi from Suomi's picture

I believe it was, but that was ten years ago, and I can't that package anywhere. Propably in the attic somewhere.

John Lyttle's picture

Fontshop has a selection of Richard Beatty typefaces but there are not samples for each one. Goodhue, for instance, is a mystery. Is it the one that is Beatty's reinterpretation of Bernhard Tango? Is Goodhue where this lowercase k came from?

Tomi from Suomi's picture

This is Beattys interpritation of Bernhard Tango, but it's not Goodhue. Here's the whole glyph.

Mitchell Au's picture

Does the list provided by Fontshop include all fonts designed by him?

PabloImpallari's picture

More R.B. fonts here
http://www.will-harris.com/store-h/richard_beatty_fonts.html
But still, can't find a match...

Tomi from Suomi's picture

No, Mitchell, it does not. And Pablo; like I said earlier, I could not find this one either, even when searching with the font name. My quess is that this font is no longer available, and therefore this Pop Quiz might in fact be an Über Expert level…
This typeface has two variants:

Tomi from Suomi's picture

This is it: Jane’s Waltz and Jane’s Waltz Swash. I still can't find it from anywhere.


And I'm sorry to choose such an impossible font. I just picked one from my Beatty-folder.

But let's start over (if you don't mind). This one is more managable, since this one is still in use today (I checked):

Mitchell Au's picture

At first glance that looks like a lowercase c...but when I think about it it might be an M

Tomi from Suomi's picture

It is an upper case glyph. That's all I'm giving right now…

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Would this help?

Tomi from Suomi's picture

And an afterthought: that C-like form reminded me of the best use of counterform I've ever seen:

PabloImpallari's picture

Is that the "etc" glyph?

Tomi from Suomi's picture

It's an alternate upper case glyph.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

The designer of this typeface is American.

eliason's picture

Some Goudy swash italic /M/s are that structure, but I can't find a match.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Not Goudy. This East Coast designer is still working.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Would this help?

John Lyttle's picture

By compiling your images and guessing a bit, I came up with this M, which looks a lot like LTC Caslon Swash.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Very close, but no cigar. It is an M, but like I mentioned earlier, the designer is an American. He is from New York.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Okay, now it’s easy: is it one of the swash alternate 'M’s in Hoefler Text Italic, by Jonathan Hoefler?

PabloImpallari's picture

Ops! Yes... I missed it, since they have 2 M alternates and I looked only at one of them.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Yes! Indeed it is. Here's the whole shebang.


Congratulations, and give us the next one.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Alright! Thanks, Tomi.

Here we go again:

eliason's picture

Is that also an M?

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hi Craig, sorry for letting you wait. No, not an M. But it is an uppercase letter.

eliason's picture

Is it an A?

Florian Hardwig's picture

That’s correct. Shall I zoom out a bit?

eliason's picture

Looks a bit like Algerian that has been through some rough times.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Rough? Yes. Algerian? No. Rather English.

Florian Hardwig's picture

This typeface was designed in the early 1980s. I saw it popping up quite a bit lately, thanks to Apple. It is available from Fonts.com, but not from FontShop nor MyFonts, at the moment.

PabloImpallari's picture

Letraset Blackmoor by David Quay?

Florian Hardwig's picture

That is correct!


From Fonts.com:

Noted British type designer David Quay designed Blackmoor in 1983. Based on an old English letter style, this textura-style Blackletter evokes a mediaeval character, expertly mixing a gothic lowercase together with Lombardic capitals. Blackmoor's rough, distressed features make it ideal for a variety of applications, from serious historical publications to horror movies, and comics.

… and CD/DVD covers and booklets. Blackmoor LET comes bundled with iWork.
Your turn, Pablo.

PabloImpallari's picture

Here is a now one.
Shouldn't be difficult.

Birdseeding's picture

Is it an Aldus k?

PabloImpallari's picture

That is correct!
Aldus, the lighter version of Palatino, redrawn for text usage.

Birdseeding's picture

All right! I'm absolutely new to this - and the whole forum in general - so this might not be the right difficulty at all. We'll see! :)

John Lyttle's picture

Well, judging from the absence of guesses, your portion of a glyph is not overly easy to identify. Would you like to offer a hint?

eliason's picture

Is it a /k/?

Birdseeding's picture

How about I zoom out a little, would that help? Also, go ahead and guess if you like as per earlier in the thread.

Syndicate content Syndicate content