>>> Type ID Pop Quiz V2.5 - Expert Level

Florian Hardwig's picture

This is how it works:

  • A portion of a glyph is published in the Type ID Pop Quiz.
  • Try to identify the glyph and the typeface. To win, you need to name at least:
    1. typeface
    2. weight
    3. character/glyph
  • Show off your knowledge by casually mentioning additional trivia, like who designed it, when and by whom was it (first) published, and other cool stuff to impress your fellow Typophiles with.
  • The winner produces a new challenge – a portion of a glyph, black on white background, presented in a 288 × 288 pixel square, including a R204G000B00 1 pixel border.
  • The person who posts a challenge can’t win the next game.

In case of any disputes, Mr Bald Condensed or me will act as judge, jury and avenging angel of wrath.

If you think this is a little too difficult, maybe try the Entry Level Type ID Pop Quiz or Intermediary Level Type ID Pop Quiz first.

Good luck everyone, and have fun. ;^)

With respectful thanks to the originator of this utterly useless but highly entertaining waste of time, the often imitated but never duplicated Cheshire Dave.

Florian Hardwig's picture

(continued from here)

Here’s the new challenge: Have fun!

sim's picture

Is this could be the german etset in its italic style?

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hi André,
nope, it’s not an ß (eszett).

typovar's picture

Hello Florian,
It's been some time since I did this.
Wild guess: Æ in some script?

typovar's picture

So Prolix ?

typovar's picture

Here's something I thought of:

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hoi Arjen,
An Æ? Yes!
Some script? Well, sort of.
No, it’s not So Prolix.

SuperUltraFabulous's picture

art deco inspired ?

typovar's picture

Another wild guess. I'm a bit stuck within all these script. And probably it's just some kind of sans-serif/italic/swashed character… The line-endings are rounded in this one, so it's not correct, but still.

Charminette Light by Joe Van Der Bos ?

Florian Hardwig's picture

Mike, no, there is no Art Deco involved.
Arjen, yes, you are on the right track: it’s a swashy italic from a sans-serif type family.

typovar's picture

It feels like OurType, but I have no clue. Sorry.

paulstonier's picture

Oh man. I think I've got it. Too bad, I can't say. That's a very careful cropping, Florian.

typovar's picture

Tell me thursday what it is. Too busy with other things right now.
Sorry.

Paul, and others: good luck.

typovar's picture

It was allmost too easy.
Name me a group of typedesigners who's famous for their curly, swashy fonts!

Right, Underware!
And this one is Auto 3 light italic

typovar's picture

Should I wait for your approval, Florian? Or can I allready start the next challenge?

This might be a tough one!

Florian Hardwig's picture

Arjen, you got it! Auto 3 Italic it is. Congratulations!
Paul, I would have zoomed out a bit today – but with such experts around, that was not necessary.

typovar's picture

Any ideas?
Should I give some hints?

sim's picture

Seems to be a fraction, may be 8/9

paulstonier's picture

Haha I was right.

Is that a %?

typovar's picture

@sim: Yes, I didn't expect that to be found so quickly. 8/9

typovar's picture

I'm off to Berlin. Will look (if possible) otherwise no response until Monday.

typovar's picture

I'm back after a very nice weekend in Berlin.
Let's continue the quest on this secret symbol. (No hints in that).

Frode Bo Helland's picture

I can’t imagine many fonts have precomposed 8/9 fractions. Perhaps it’s from something pre Opentype? Unless it’s an arbitrary fraction.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Dalton Maag sell fonts with 8/9 fractions, and their Viato Bold isn’t far off (but it can’t be something so obscure, can it?).

paulstonier's picture

That looks about right, Frode.

typovar's picture

It is not really obscure. It isn't pre-OpenType either, released in 2010. The weight I've used was for free.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Adelle Extra Bold!

Edit: No, it was released in 2009!

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Or, it might be Aller!

Edit: Nope! 2008. Man, I have to check these dates before I get so excited.

typovar's picture

John is right: Bold Limited to be precise.

Congrats and good luck with the next Question.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

I’d say that’s rather obscure :) Congrats John!

John Lyttle's picture

Cool! Here’s the new cropped glyph.

John Lyttle's picture

No guesses, no questions? Should I give a hint?

eliason's picture

Is it the A of Quadraat Sans?

John Lyttle's picture

It is an A, but it is not a typeface by Fred Smeijers.

John Lyttle's picture

The type designer is Canadian.

typovar's picture

I'm not allowed to play this time, right?

John Lyttle's picture

That is correct, Arjen. Perhaps I should drop another hint: the family of typefaces (serif and sans-serif) was custom designed for a national publication.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

I think it’s the A in Nick Shinn’s Globe and Mail News regular. It might also be some other intersection, M, W and N have similar shapes.

John Lyttle's picture

You are right, Frode. Globe and Mail News is the font and, as I confirmed earlier, it is an A. Nick Shinn's type design is one of the big reasons I enjoy my Globe and Mail subscription.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

I just upped the level to über-expertise.

sim's picture

Probably the e letter.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

No, it’s not an e.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

When is the proper time to drop a hint? Oh, I can give you one right ahead. The font and it’s creator are both american, but not from the US.

eliason's picture

Is it an A?

eliason's picture

/fl/ ligature?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Here’s another hint. The font in question sports a rather unusual female glyph (and I’m not talking about the ordinal).

Frode Bo Helland's picture

I should have written “right away” instead of “right ahead”, btw. Please forgive my lousy English.

eliason's picture

Is it Fondo?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

I think it’s time for another hint:
This family of fonts has more than one display cut.

typovar's picture

Sunday afternoon, outside it's too hot to hang out…

Why not play along in a game out Typophillic-expert-level-quizing?

typovar's picture

It could be Leksa, but the bar doesn't cross the l… No, it's not.

A strange female-sign indeed:

typovar's picture

Internet is really slow today. Must be the heat.
No further answers right now, sorry.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

And it’s not drawn by someone from America. Sorry, it’s not it.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

A summary:

• It is a fl ligature
• It’s creator is american, but not from the US.
• The font in question sports a rather unusual female glyph (and I’m not talking about the ordinal).
• The family of fonts have more than one display cut.

And a new hint:

• Another typeface by the same designer was drawn as a corporate typeface for a european city.

eliason's picture

Is it PampaType's Arlt?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

ooo, close

eliason's picture

Rayuela? No, that's not it.

eliason's picture

Borges Titulo Blanca!

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Yes! Borges Titulo Blanca it is.

eliason's picture

So what's the female glyph?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

The cow.

eliason's picture

Okay, here's the next one. Not so über as the last, I think!

John Lyttle's picture

Is it a c?

eliason's picture

Yes it is.

eliason's picture

Nope.

eliason's picture

There you go! It's actually the regular width and the black weight, but my cropping probably makes that next to impossible to divine, so I'm going to call that a win for John.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Does this mean I can guess again? (If I promise to take it easy with the überness if I happen to guess right.)

Florian Hardwig's picture

John, impressive! Congratulations.
Frode, yes, you can participate in this round.

John Lyttle's picture

Here’s a new glyph portion.

John Lyttle's picture

The designer in question is not Nick Shinn this time, but he is someone (like Mr. Shinn — and myself, for that matter) who came from a European nation and has made Canada his home.

sim's picture

I would say that's a w.

John Lyttle's picture

It's a W.

John Lyttle's picture

Typophile readers may be more familiar with this type designer's scripts and his contributions to discussions on this site about a certain Estonian calligrapher.

eliason's picture

Ooh I know it now.

John Lyttle's picture

Yeah, I usually give away too much in the hints.

typovar's picture

Looks more like Air Italia ?

John Lyttle's picture

I’m not sure I understand your question about Air Italia, Arjen. I suspect you’re barking up the wrong tree.

sim's picture

Is the type designer could be Anton Koovit

John Lyttle's picture

No, I’m afraid he couldn’t be Anton Koovit (although my understanding of quantum physics is sketchy).

Another hint: this typeface was released in 1991, according to Identifont.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

This is Lineale by Gérard Mariscalchi, and according to his website it was designed in 1997.

John Lyttle's picture

Yes, you are right again, Frode (on both counts). Your turn.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Hint: The family has a rather geographic(al) name.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

It’s designer is from the Czech Republic.

Florian Hardwig's picture

It’s not Vida (21 Italic), is it?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

You are VERY close!

Florian Hardwig's picture

I don’t get the ‘geographic(al) name’ hint … is it from the Vida family?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

The Vida family is called Evropa (on the front page). Anyway, you were right, only not with the weight. It’s Evropa Vida 32 Italic.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Ah, I see. Evropa seems to be a special package, containing a few styles of two families, with enhanced language support:
Vida and Politic B, enriched by Greek and Cyrillics, have been adapted for the purposes of Czech Presidency of EU.

And I was pondering on what Vidå/Danmark, or Vida/Oregon might have to do with this!
Off to prepare a new challenge …

Florian Hardwig's picture

Here you go, experts!

eliason's picture

Looks like a /W/ or /w/ from Banjoman Open Bold, flipped horizontally.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Not bad – yes, it is a ‘W’. But as flipping, rotating, squooshing etc. is not allowed, the answer is: no, not Banjoman.

Florian Hardwig's picture

This typeface has been named after a place. If you travel from the designer’s home to the city where the foundry is based, this place will be more or less on your way – a bit closer to the latter. For a 1,400 km distance, one would usually take a plane, admittedly.

Florian Hardwig's picture

I’ll zoom out a bit.

This font is available from FontShop, but not from MyFonts.

riccard0's picture

Mmm... Not among the 591 results for "inline", nor in their "multilinear" fontlist...
And sure the direction of the inner stroke is strange...
By the way, it reminds me of the VW logo ;-)

Florian Hardwig's picture

It is featured in the ‘inline’ FontLists. Only, this is an alternate glyph (I know, I know, this is mean – sorry. But this is the Expert level, after all!). The distance from the place after which this typeface has been named to the home of Volkswagen is 75 miles.

riccard0's picture

I suppose it could/should be Dessau Plakat.
But I'm unable to find the right glyph.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Oh dear, you are right. It doesn’t appear in FontShop’s character set. I’m sorry that I didn’t check that before. Yes, it is Dessau Plakat, designed by Gábor Kóthay from Hungary, released with Fountain in Malmö, Sweden. I can assure you that this ‘W’ is included in my font file – even twice!


It was not my intention to make this extra difficult. Glad you nevertheless found the correct answer. Well deserved, your turn!

riccard0's picture

Oh, well, no problem! :-)
While I’m looking for something to post, I should mention that the name of the font is an obvious reference to the second city where the Bauhaus moved in 1925 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bauhaus#Dessau).

riccard0's picture

It's not an inline typeface.

eliason's picture

Is this an @?

riccard0's picture

It's not an @ either.

eliason's picture

S?

riccard0's picture

Not a S, sorry.

eliason's picture

e?

riccard0's picture

Mmm... no.

riccard0's picture

Here's another slightly moved and zoomed out crop of the same glyph:

riccard0's picture

The name of the font is the name of a fruit.

eliason's picture

Thought it might be Tomate, but that doesn't have any verticals like this.

riccard0's picture

Well, while the tomato is native to South America, it is now often regarded as a typical mediterranean produce. The fruit after which the font shown here is named truly is a typical and original mediterranean product.

eliason's picture

Looking through the /g/s and /9/s from different weights and versions of Antique Olive, but the curves don't match.

riccard0's picture

That's just because the glyph is neither a g nor a 9... ;-)

eliason's picture

Ah, Antique Olive bold /i/?

eliason's picture

Or Roman, or Black; I can't tell.

riccard0's picture

The first one (Roger Excoffon’s Antique Olive Bold) is the winner! :-)
I’m sorry (almost ;-) for the malicious crop.
Congratulations and please, your turn.

eliason's picture

That was a clever crop. Here's a new one:

eliason's picture

As it happens, I can't really answer that with a yes or no...

riccard0's picture

Mmm… I suspect why, but I can’t say nothing.

eliason's picture

Nope.

eliason's picture

You were closer the first time.

eliason's picture

Yes!

eliason's picture

This is a recent font design by a young American designer - his first professional release, I believe.

eliason's picture

In this Massachusetts designer's most recent release, he exagerrated the most prominent feature of this mystery font much further.

Jan's picture

Trilby by David Jonathan Ross?
The most recent release with the exagerrated most prominent feature being Manicotti?

eliason's picture

Winner!


Ross's 2009 Trilby has slab serifs with exaggerated weight; his Manicotti takes that playfulness to the extreme.
You're up, Jan.

Jan's picture

Thanks.
Here we (the few of us) go:

Florian Hardwig's picture

That looks like an interesting counter! At the moment, I have no idea. Maybe a ‘k’?

Jan's picture

It’s not from a recently released typeface.
It’s not an obscure glyph.
It’s not a ‘k’.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Oblique a?

Jan's picture

Nope.

Florian Hardwig's picture

A figure, perhaps?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

It could also be an R or a B.

Jan's picture

A figure, yes.

Jan's picture

Yes.

Jan's picture

Nope.
It’s not a script.

sim's picture

Probably a three with a loop in the middle.

Jan's picture

Nope. No loop.

eliason's picture

Another clue maybe?

SuperUltraFabulous's picture

The origin: USA, EUROPE, ASIA?

Jan's picture

The typeface’s origin is Canada.

John Lyttle's picture

Wow, this challenge has been up since July 18, 2010. Very difficult to ID, although it’s always rewarding to scour through the typefaces of Shinntype, Canada Type and others. Any possibility of a new clue, Jan?

Jan's picture

The typeface in question was drawn in 1977, but is based on an older design commissioned by the Governor General of Canada-in-Council in 1967 to create a new and distinctively Canadian typeface. This earlier face went by a different name.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Oh, it’s Carl Dair’s Raleigh, right? Not that obscure, indeed!

Jan's picture

We have another (see Intermediate Level) winner.
Although, Carl Dair’s original typeface was called Cartier and quite different.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cartier_%28typeface%29
Raleigh is an “interpretation”.
Cartier was continued as Cartier Book.
http://www.fonts.com/FindFonts/HiddenGems/Cartier.htm

Florian Hardwig's picture

New challenge:

John Lyttle's picture

That looks like a piece of a W in Auriol italic. Or maybe the bold italic.

Florian Hardwig's picture

W as in: We have a winner!
Well done, John. Auriol Bold Italic it is.
Your turn!

eliason's picture

Bravo!

sim's picture

Congratulations John It wasn't an easy one. However I think the correct letter is lowercase w instead of the caps W as shown ;¬)

John Lyttle's picture

Here’s a new one:

sim's picture

Probably a lower case s.

John Lyttle's picture

Nope, not an s.

eliason's picture

A five?

sim's picture

The lower case g

John Lyttle's picture

Craig, you’re on the right track: it is indeed a 5.

John Lyttle's picture

Here's a hint: the type designer is from the USA.

sim's picture

Some typeface from Christian Schwartz?

John Lyttle's picture

No, not Christian Schwartz.

SuperUltraFabulous's picture

is it a recent face or an oldie but goody?

PabloImpallari's picture

Birra Stoud by Joshua Darden?
http://www.dardenstudio.com/typefaces/birra_stout-features

I guess it can't be wrong... so, here is the new one:

sim's picture

…[Off topic] ;¬) Pablo, As usual, It would have been better to wait before being declared winner of the challenge before to launch a new one.

John Lyttle's picture

You are correct, Pablo.

PabloImpallari's picture

@sim:
I was a little over-exited maybe. I will wait next time.

@John:
Thanks

sim's picture

@Pablo: I've already knew that. BTW, Congratulations to having solve the challenge.

PabloImpallari's picture

Anyone still playing?

sim's picture

A swashed glyph.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

It's a script, but I have no idea which one…

Tomi from Suomi's picture

…I think it's an upper case 'O', and those two different terminals should work as a hint…

PabloImpallari's picture

@Sim:
It's an alternate and can be considered swash, however, it was not included on the font OT features. You have to look at the glyphs set to find it.

@Tomi:
Yep, it's a script. A beautiful one.
Nop, it's not a O.

Here it is again, less zooming.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

An upper case E…

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Is that Champion Script?

PabloImpallari's picture

Not E, but you are closer.
Not Champion.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Ampersand?

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Bugger! That new sample reminds me of Herb Lubalins' Mother & Child logo…

Mitchell Au's picture

It looks like the ampersand from the Globe and Mail. Whatsitcalled....

PabloImpallari's picture

Tip:
The author of this font has received last year, the same award that Lubalin in 1980.
That's easy now :)

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Young Gallant.

PabloImpallari's picture

Congrats Tomi!
It's the Gallant alternate ampersand.
Enjoy it at full size.

Your turn now... let's keep playing!!!

Tomi from Suomi's picture

That is a truly beautyful ampersand!

I'll give you this:

Mitchell Au's picture

It's either an R or a k..

PabloImpallari's picture

Let's see if we can narrow down the options....

Is it from the brush of one of these geniuses:
Michel Clark, Rob Leuschke, Stephen Rapp, Jason Walcott, Charles Borges de Oliveira, or AlePaul/Angel Koziupa?

Mitchell Au's picture

Is it lower case k from Bernhard Tango by Lucian Bernhard?

Tomi from Suomi's picture

None of the above, Pablo. And yes, it's lower case k but not Tango.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Hint: this is a re-digitalization from the nineties of an original from cirka 1910…

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Mitchell, you are very close: this is not Bernhard Tango, but a font based on it.

Mitchell Au's picture

Carmine Tango? Wait, that's not it...

Mitchell Au's picture

So is this the one from c1910 or the 90s?

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Sorry; original (Bernhard Tango) is from 1931-34, and this version is from 1995.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

And this could in fact be more difficult than I thought; I Googled the font and the maker, and found no mention of this font. This was in a font package I bought in 1999.

Mitchell Au's picture

Was the package released in 1995 or 1999?

Tomi from Suomi's picture

1995 or 1996, I believe.

PabloImpallari's picture

Not Ballroom Tango also..

Tomi from Suomi's picture

No. A big hint: made by Richard Beatty.

Mitchell Au's picture

Was the package called Richard Beatty Designs?

Tomi from Suomi's picture

I believe it was, but that was ten years ago, and I can't that package anywhere. Propably in the attic somewhere.

John Lyttle's picture

Fontshop has a selection of Richard Beatty typefaces but there are not samples for each one. Goodhue, for instance, is a mystery. Is it the one that is Beatty's reinterpretation of Bernhard Tango? Is Goodhue where this lowercase k came from?

Tomi from Suomi's picture

This is Beattys interpritation of Bernhard Tango, but it's not Goodhue. Here's the whole glyph.

Mitchell Au's picture

Does the list provided by Fontshop include all fonts designed by him?

PabloImpallari's picture

More R.B. fonts here
http://www.will-harris.com/store-h/richard_beatty_fonts.html
But still, can't find a match...

Tomi from Suomi's picture

No, Mitchell, it does not. And Pablo; like I said earlier, I could not find this one either, even when searching with the font name. My quess is that this font is no longer available, and therefore this Pop Quiz might in fact be an Über Expert level…
This typeface has two variants:

Tomi from Suomi's picture

This is it: Jane’s Waltz and Jane’s Waltz Swash. I still can't find it from anywhere.


And I'm sorry to choose such an impossible font. I just picked one from my Beatty-folder.

But let's start over (if you don't mind). This one is more managable, since this one is still in use today (I checked):

Mitchell Au's picture

At first glance that looks like a lowercase c...but when I think about it it might be an M

Tomi from Suomi's picture

It is an upper case glyph. That's all I'm giving right now…

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Would this help?

Tomi from Suomi's picture

And an afterthought: that C-like form reminded me of the best use of counterform I've ever seen:

PabloImpallari's picture

Is that the "etc" glyph?

Tomi from Suomi's picture

It's an alternate upper case glyph.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

The designer of this typeface is American.

eliason's picture

Some Goudy swash italic /M/s are that structure, but I can't find a match.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Not Goudy. This East Coast designer is still working.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Would this help?

John Lyttle's picture

By compiling your images and guessing a bit, I came up with this M, which looks a lot like LTC Caslon Swash.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Very close, but no cigar. It is an M, but like I mentioned earlier, the designer is an American. He is from New York.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Okay, now it’s easy: is it one of the swash alternate 'M’s in Hoefler Text Italic, by Jonathan Hoefler?

PabloImpallari's picture

Ops! Yes... I missed it, since they have 2 M alternates and I looked only at one of them.

Tomi from Suomi's picture

Yes! Indeed it is. Here's the whole shebang.


Congratulations, and give us the next one.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Alright! Thanks, Tomi.

Here we go again:

eliason's picture

Is that also an M?

Florian Hardwig's picture

Hi Craig, sorry for letting you wait. No, not an M. But it is an uppercase letter.

eliason's picture

Is it an A?

Florian Hardwig's picture

That’s correct. Shall I zoom out a bit?

eliason's picture

Looks a bit like Algerian that has been through some rough times.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Rough? Yes. Algerian? No. Rather English.

Florian Hardwig's picture

This typeface was designed in the early 1980s. I saw it popping up quite a bit lately, thanks to Apple. It is available from Fonts.com, but not from FontShop nor MyFonts, at the moment.

PabloImpallari's picture

Letraset Blackmoor by David Quay?

Florian Hardwig's picture

That is correct!


From Fonts.com:

Noted British type designer David Quay designed Blackmoor in 1983. Based on an old English letter style, this textura-style Blackletter evokes a mediaeval character, expertly mixing a gothic lowercase together with Lombardic capitals. Blackmoor's rough, distressed features make it ideal for a variety of applications, from serious historical publications to horror movies, and comics.

… and CD/DVD covers and booklets. Blackmoor LET comes bundled with iWork.
Your turn, Pablo.

PabloImpallari's picture

Here is a now one.
Shouldn't be difficult.

Birdseeding's picture

Is it an Aldus k?

PabloImpallari's picture

That is correct!
Aldus, the lighter version of Palatino, redrawn for text usage.

Birdseeding's picture

All right! I'm absolutely new to this - and the whole forum in general - so this might not be the right difficulty at all. We'll see! :)

John Lyttle's picture

Well, judging from the absence of guesses, your portion of a glyph is not overly easy to identify. Would you like to offer a hint?

eliason's picture

Is it a /k/?

Birdseeding's picture

How about I zoom out a little, would that help? Also, go ahead and guess if you like as per earlier in the thread.

Birdseeding's picture

Well, now it's gone easy suddenly - it is indeed another k.

Birdseeding's picture

It's not a script font.

Birdseeding's picture

It's a typeface directed towards a very specialised user. In fact, it's a futher narrowing of the intended user base from the another version of this typeface, which already has a narrow intended group of users.

John Lyttle's picture

Is it the "k" in Jeremy Tankard's Aspect (heavy weight, I think)?

Birdseeding's picture

No, I'm afraid not. It's a sans-serif... more or less, though a bit cursive.

PabloImpallari's picture

Looks like Ronnia, but it's not.

Nick Job's picture

Sassoon Infant Bold /k/?

Birdseeding's picture

Nick's got it. Well done! Sassoon is a typeface designed by Dr. Rosemary Sassoon, a handwriting researcher and typographer, especially for children to read. Each letterform has been thoroughly researched with tests of actual children reading. It comes in four versions, of which the most recent, "infant", is for younger children and includes more handwriting-like glyphs.

Nick Job's picture

Here goes...

Jan's picture

Q?

Nick Job's picture

Yes, Q.

Nick Job's picture

Need a clou?

Jan's picture

Yes.

Nick Job's picture

Since you know its a Q...

Nick Job's picture

When you stick the name of this font into Wikipedia, you get an Austrian guy who played field handball last century, no mention of the font though!

riccard0's picture

Houschka, by fellow typophile Nick Cooke.
It's funny how, distracted by the curvy A, I never noticed this beautifully sharp Q!

http://www.identifont.com/show?4Y1

Nick Job's picture

Well done, Riccardo. It is indeed a very beautiful Q from Houschka Pro Medium (Nick Cooke's G-Type).

You're up next!

Nick Cooke's picture

That took a while! Well done Riccardo.

riccard0's picture

Thanks all :-)
Here we go:

Birdseeding's picture

Is it a /¿/?

riccard0's picture

¡No! ;-)

Ria Anderson's picture

Is this the Q from Ambicase Modern Poster?

riccard0's picture

Kudos for such a quick answer! Indeed it is.
(if anyone missed it, here’s the thread where fellow typophile Craig Eliason shared its development: http://www.typophile.com/node/60316)

Ria Anderson's picture

Thank you!

Here's a new one:

eliason's picture

Now I've really arrived! :-)

Birdseeding's picture

Okay, before I go clinically insane, is it a /d/? ;)

Ria Anderson's picture

Yes, it's a /d/.

Ria Anderson's picture

The designer of this typeface is American.

Ria Anderson's picture

Hint: This typeface began its life as a Jenson revival.

Birdseeding's picture

I have to confess I'm just about ready to give this one up. :D More hints?

Ria Anderson's picture

Hmm... Here's a few hints:

The designer developed this typeface here on Typophile, where he originally labelled it with a saintly name.

It's frequently brought up in discussions of typefaces with relatively-upright italics.

The typeface contains a (beautiful) inline variant.

PabloImpallari's picture

Eason italic? By Randall Jones
Love the Inline version, BTW

Ria Anderson's picture

Yes, you got it! I agree, the inline is gorgeous.

Your turn!

PabloImpallari's picture

Oka.. Here we go again!

eliason's picture

Is that a /7/?

PabloImpallari's picture

Yep it is.
A beautiful one.

PabloImpallari's picture

Tip: It´s a Italic 7

Sindre's picture

Another hint, please?

PabloImpallari's picture

Tip: It´s not the schoolbook version.

riccard0's picture

It could be a Century* (751?) Bold or Black Italic.

* there are so many (cfr. http://typophile.com/node/80989)

Sindre's picture

I've checked that, but no exact match.

PabloImpallari's picture

Riccardo is right.
Century 715 Bitstream Black Italic

riccard0's picture

I think Sindre got it right before me! :-)

Sindre's picture

I removed my answer, because I couldn't make Century 751 Black (nor any of the other black and bold Centuries I tried) exactly match the sample. So nominally, you won.

riccard0's picture

But, morally, the victory is yours.
And, I'm sure you will come up with something better than anything I could.

Sindre's picture

OK, then.

This shouldn't be too hard, I think.

Sindre's picture

t.

Sindre's picture

This typeface might not quite deserve its name.

Sindre's picture

No-one? Really? OK, I'll make it easy. This typeface is named after (but not necessarily designed by) a prolific British type designer.

eliason's picture

Ah, Gill Facia it must be.

What do you know about this font? I've never come across it before?

Sindre's picture

Gill Facia it is.

I don't know much about it, really. I once worked for an organisation that insisted on using Gill Sans for its written stuff, so I licensed Gill Facia as a companion face for headlines and stuff. I actually quite like it, with all its alternates and ligatures, though it's generally scorned upon by designers, I think. It's designed by Colin Banks, who also gave the British Post Office its look.

Your turn!

eliason's picture

Here we go:

Birdseeding's picture

Is that some sort of swash?

eliason's picture

No, not a swash.

eliason's picture

No, and no.
Another view, same glyph and scale:

riccard0's picture

@?

eliason's picture

Yes, it's an at-sign.

eliason's picture

The designer is a creative character from South America.

riccard0's picture

Titulata Fat, by Eduardo Rodríguez Tunni of Tipo.

eliason's picture

That's it, Riccard0! It's the clever reversed-out at-sign from Titulata.


You're up.

riccard0's picture

Thank you, Craig.
Now I need to sort out some computer problem and will post my cropped image as soon as possible! :-)

riccard0's picture


Here we are.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Is it an l (el)?

riccard0's picture

Close… but no ;-)

Birdseeding's picture

Is it an /L/ then?

riccard0's picture

Not close in that sense ;-)

Frode Bo Helland's picture

It's an e?

riccard0's picture

Not a vowel either.

riccard0's picture

That’s it! :-)

riccard0's picture

One could say that this font is strong

Florian Hardwig's picture

Ah, that was too much of a hint!
It is Carl Reissberger’s Forte, right? One of the few typefaces designed by an Austrian. And one of the nicer fonts that come with Microsoft Office – at least I feel it has suffered less from having been bundled than others.

riccard0's picture

Yes, it is: the uncompromising, double-looped, single-stroke, baseline-breaking lowercase k from Forte (which, in Italian, means "strong" or "loud"):


Your turn :-)

Florian Hardwig's picture

Thanks!
Here is the new challenge. No hints for the moment. Happy guessing!

Florian Hardwig's picture

This character is not a letter, but it is part of ASCII.

eliason's picture

% maybe?

Florian Hardwig's picture

That is correct. The designer of this typeface taught in New York and Boston.

komiska's picture

Matthew Carter?

Florian Hardwig's picture

No. The designer died while imprisoned in Nazi Germany.

Tim Ahrens's picture

Is it a Czech designer?

Florian Hardwig's picture

Yes. The typeface has been digitized twice. One of the digital versions comes in three variations, optimized for different sizes.

Florian Hardwig's picture

Exactly! It is the percent sign from Preissig Antikva, designed by Vojtěch Preissig (1873–1944) in the 1920s, digitized by František Štorm with the help of Otakar Karlas in 1998.


Your turn, Tim.

Tim Ahrens's picture

Ah, this font is perfect for cropping a character. Spoilt for choice!

Jiří Toman's picture

Someone has to start...is that letter ‘G’?

Tim Ahrens's picture

No, not a G. Not a g either.

eliason's picture

Some kind of pseudo-Hebrew font? Or Art Nouveau?

Tim Ahrens's picture

No, not a pseudo-Hebrew. Not Art Nouveau either. Definitely retro but a few decades later.

Jiří Toman's picture

So it could be one of those ‘psychadelic’ fonts from sixties/seventies, right?

Jiří Toman's picture

Well...isn’t that letter ‘J’ from Blackcurrant Squash designed by Rian Hughes?

Tim Ahrens's picture

Solved!

It is indeed Rian Hughes' Blackcurrant. I think I took the J from Blackcurrant Black, not Squash, but looking at it, there is hardly any difference so let's not nitpick.

Jiří, over to you.

Jiří Toman's picture

Ok Tim, thanks for your generosity!

So let’s try this one…

riccard0's picture

&?

Jiří Toman's picture

So there is a little hint – if I had to give this typeface a nickname, I’d use ‘The Überjannon’.

Jiří Toman's picture

Should I give you another hint?

riccard0's picture

I suppose it’s italic, but it’s the regular one or an alternate?

Jiří Toman's picture

You're definitely right about the italic. And it’s the regular one.

Jiří Toman's picture

All right, no move for quite a long time, let’s show the whole glyph…

SuperUltraFabulous's picture

That’s Storm’s Serapion Italic.

I know those lacrymal terminals anywhere!

Mike :-)

Jiří Toman's picture

You’re right Mike :)

A beautifuly crafted and ballanced typeface, released for the first time in 1997 by Františěk Štorm’s type foundry Střešovická písmolijna (Storm Type Foundry).

Now it’s your turn!

eliason's picture

Bump. Hey SuperUltraFabulous, you've had five months, have you come up with a new challenge yet? ;-)

eliason's picture

Bump!

Florian Hardwig's picture

Craig, if Mike (SuperUltraFabulous ) hasn’t posted a new challenge within the next 24 hours, I hereby decree that it is your turn to do so.

eliason's picture

Okay, here we go.

Tim Ahrens's picture

Is that the original rotation? Is it a w?

eliason's picture

Yes, it's not rotated. No, not a w.

riccard0's picture

|&| would be too predictable, right?

eliason's picture

Not an ampersand.

Birdseeding's picture

Cound it be an /f/?

eliason's picture

Not an f.

eliason's picture

Not a k.

Tim Ahrens's picture

Is it a /b/?

eliason's picture

Not a b.
Another view, same scale:

And no, it's not an /e/ :-)

You might say the designer prioritized getting the liaisons between letters to work over using a conventional structure for this particular letter.

hrant's picture

Mistral, non? I was actually going to guess that as soon as I saw it, but having seen Mistral in metal I guess the digital outlines don't do it justice.

BTW, on what planet was that 24 hours? (That can probably be specifically answered actually. But this is not Astronomophile.)

hhp

eliason's picture

Mistral is right. And the glyph?
You're right that this is an old and crappy digitization I found on my computer, the outlines of which don't do justice to the original (but it's the only one I had on hand to zoom so close into).

hrant's picture

x

hhp

John Lyttle's picture

Hrant should still win for identifying the typeface, but is it the /x/?

riccard0's picture

Wow, I never noticed how peculiar Mistral's |x| is!
Now we know how an hastly written Turkish Lira will look ;-)

hrant's picture

So is it my turn? How hard am I supposed to make this? Digital fonts only?

hhp

eliason's picture

Yes, it's Mistral's /x/. Hrant has it.

hrant's picture

This should be about right:

hhp

Birdseeding's picture

Okay, I guess we're guessing glyphs again then. :) It is a /G/?

hrant's picture

It is a /G/?

Hmmm, I guess I'd have to say: yes and no. :-)

hhp

hrant's picture

I'm hoping to pass the baton before my trip on the 13th, so I'm not going to wait too long before dropping a hint:

This font lives in a large, conventional house.

--

BTW, I just realized I was supposed to show off. I mean about the one I got, Mistral. So, behold the large and small masters of the /a in metal Mistral:

hhp

riccard0's picture
It is a /G/?

I guess I'd have to say: yes and no.

Are we talking about middlecase/uncial or simply small caps?

hrant's picture

It's lowercase.

hhp

riccard0's picture

It seems I was overcomplicating your answer ;-)

hrant's picture

OK, back from my epic journey to Yerevan, Istanbul and Reading, it seems I need to drop another hint...

And I'll just list them all here:
- The glyph is a lowercase /g.
- The font lives in a large, conventional house.
- And: The family features three "flavors" (each in four weights).

hhp

PabloImpallari's picture

It's from Summer Stone?

hrant's picture

He lives in the same half of the same state, but he's younger.

hhp

daverowland's picture

Reliq

I'd punt at standard extra active.

hrant's picture

Bingo! Good job, good job.
Don't forget to show off something you know about Reliq and/or Carl.

Aaaaand you're up.

hhp

daverowland's picture

Sorry, I don't know anything about Reliq or Carl. I just thought from your sample that if it was a lower case g, that shape must be from a kind of uncial font.
Here's a quite interesting article about Roger Excoffon though that some of you might have missed... http://typofonderie.com/gazette/post/roger-excoffon-a-part-of-the-mythol...

daverowland's picture

Ok, here goes... Not sure if this is easy or difficult. We'll see

hrant's picture

I know that article because I translated it :-) since it's included in Rault's book about Excoffon.

hhp

sim's picture

That's a lowercase p or n.

daverowland's picture

No. It is a tricky one then...
It is lower case

Birdseeding's picture

If it's neither p or n it has to be m, doesn't it? Or a strange ligature involving r?

daverowland's picture

Well, it's not a p, n or m ;)

riccard0's picture

|r|?

daverowland's picture

r-something.
I'll give you a clue - this glyph appears in the name of the font

Birdseeding's picture

Ah, that might have made it too searchable. :) Livory italic: http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/hvdfonts/livory/italic/

daverowland's picture

Yep, well done. Sorry I made it too easy.

Birdseeding's picture

Bum, I don't know any exciting trivia about Livory. Maybe you can supply some?

In the meantime, here's the next challenge:

sim's picture

S, Sterling or french ampersand?

Birdseeding's picture

Sterling is right. :)

Tim Ahrens's picture

Beorcana?

Birdseeding's picture

No, sorry. I'll wait another day or two before dropping clues.

Birdseeding's picture

This designer's handiwork is seen everyday by (I'm sure) the vast majority of Typophile users.

Birdseeding's picture

Dammit, I thought my last clue might have provided a hint.

riccard0's picture

Yes, I think it has, but, at least in my case, memory failed me, and, given Typophile’s present state of non-searchabily, I didn’t even tried to look for a lead.

Birdseeding's picture

That last throwaway comment was meant to be another clue.

daverowland's picture

Haha, clever. I know it but I'm not allowed to guess!

Birdseeding's picture

Look, if Dave can look closely at what I've written and see what's been hinted, you can too. :)

Birdseeding's picture

This designer is most well-known for his work on other peoples' fonts.

riccard0's picture

Ok, I was looking in the wrong places...
The crop is from Amanda (regular weight), by Tom Rickner, best known as the man behind the production and hinting of Georgia, Verdana and Tahoma, among several others fonts.

Birdseeding's picture

Yep, well done. It was difficult figuring out more explicit clues than the ones I'd already given, without making it all too apparent. :D

riccard0's picture

Thank you.
So I guess it’s my turn now.
I will post something soonish.

riccard0's picture

Here we go:

riccard0's picture

Should I start dropping hints?

daverowland's picture

Is it an s?

riccard0's picture

It’s not.

Mitchell Au's picture

Is it a 5?

riccard0's picture

Johan, according to rules, you shouldn’t participate this turn.
Well, the rules actually say you can’t win it, but you know what I mean :-)

Mitchell, no, not a 5.

Birdseeding's picture

Oh, I thought that just applied to guessing actual fonts. :) Will shush now.

eliason's picture

S?

riccard0's picture

It’S not ;-)

eliason's picture

$?

riccard0's picture

It’s basic alphanumeric.

eliason's picture

g?

riccard0's picture

Yes, |g| it is.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Nebulon?

riccard0's picture

Well, you almost nailed it.
Except that Nebulon was never released with that name.
Could you also tell us the style?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Aha! That’s why I couldn’t find it anywhere. Biome Ultra, I suspect.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Or Wide, or Wide ultra.

hrant's picture

That's the second Crossgrove in four glyphs.

hhp

riccard0's picture

Actually, just Black, but Wide, indeed:


Well done!
Your turn :-)

riccard0's picture

That's the second Crossgrove in four glyphs.

You’re right. I hadn’t noticed. It seems like his glyphs lend themselves to be quiz material ;-)

Frode Bo Helland's picture


Good luck!

Birdseeding's picture

Interrobang?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Yes! Good call.

Birdseeding's picture

P22 Underground Pro (Demi)?

Frode Bo Helland's picture

Bingo! That was too easy. I’ll have to up the level next time.

Birdseeding's picture

Varsågod:

Birdseeding's picture

Whut not even a glyph guess? It should be pretty obv.

Frode Bo Helland's picture

I can’t guess right?

riccard0's picture

|z|?

Birdseeding's picture

Indeed, it's a lower-case z.

Mitchell Au's picture

Is it by a Swedish designer?

Birdseeding's picture

No, it's not. In fact, this glyph is from one of those extra alphabets added to make the product have a wider appeal.

riccard0's picture

Do you mean it’s from a CJK font?

Birdseeding's picture

No, but the alphabet of it's source of inspiration – and that originally designed – is not the latin one. :)

Birdseeding's picture

This typeface has a wealth of quirky detail that makes it obvious to the knowledgeable viewer in the country concerned that it's indeed this typeface. It's sort of a classic.

Birdseeding's picture

The original designer of this typeface worked on it for five years, combining influences from 18th-century cyrillic type and renaissance roman type.

sim's picture

Is the designer could be Jean-François Porchez?

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